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Local News

  • Supreme Court hears arguments in Brunswick traffic court case

    RALEIGH—North Carolina Supreme Court Justices on Tuesday heard arguments in the matter of Brunswick County’s Administrative Traffic Court.

    Three of the high court’s seven justices were recused from hearing arguments, leaving four justices to hear arguments Tuesday morning. Court official Dick Ellis said Chief Justice Sarah Parker, associate justice Patricia Timmons-Goodson and senior associate justice Mark Martin were recused.

    Justices are not required to disclose the nature of his or her conflict leading to a recusual, Ellis said.

  • Raleigh officer visits Brunswick’s mental health court

    BOLIVIA—For Raleigh Police Officer Michael Macario, the “serve” carries as much weight as the “protect” in a police officer’s oath to “serve and protect.”

    And that oath goes for all people, including the often-overlooked mentally ill population, Macario stressed.

  • Board of education to take up school calendar at February meeting

    BOLIVIA—The Brunswick County Board of Education may make changes to the school calendar that would require approval of the state’s General Assembly.

    An option being considered for the 2012-2013 school year could push the district’s start date up sooner than current state law allows.

    The board will consider school calendar options for the 2012-2013 school year at its upcoming meeting next month. Members tabled a discussion on the matter at their Jan. 3 meeting, opting to take up at its next meeting on Feb. 7.

  • Weekend blaze damages Holden Beach house

    A weekend blaze damaged a home on Holden Beach.

    Tri-Beach Volunteer Fire Department Chief Doug Todd said the department received a call that a home at 111 Starfish Drive was on fire at 7:25 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 7. No one was injured.

    Todd said it took fire crews about seven minutes to arrive where they were joined by members of the Civietown and Supply fire departments.

  • Hearing on landfill expansion continued until February

    BOLIVIA—A hearing to consider whether to grant the county a special exception permit to expand its existing construction and demolition landfill will continue next month.

    After about seven hours of testimony Monday, Jan. 9, Brunswick County Planning Board members opted to continue the hearing until their next meeting, which will be at 1 p.m. Monday, Feb. 13.

  • Commissioner Charles Warren’s upcoming hearing: What to expect

    At their next meeting, Brunswick County commissioners will decide if there is just cause to remove county commissioner and Department of Social Services chairman Charles Warren from the DSS board.

    Commissioners will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17, for a hearing on the matter.

    It is not a criminal hearing; however, it will be conducted in a similar fashion to a court proceeding, Brunswick County Attorney Huey Marshall said.

  • Traffic court matter to be heard in state Supreme Court Tuesday

    RALEIGH—North Carolina Supreme Court Justices on Tuesday will hear arguments in the matter of Brunswick County’s Administrative Traffic Court.

    According to the state’s Supreme Court calendar, oral arguments are scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 10, in Raleigh.

    Though the court program was reinstated this past September, the disagreement between District Attorney Jon David and longtime District Judge Jerry Jolly goes back to April 2011, when Jolly issued an administrative order halting David’s then-fledgling traffic court program.

  • Brunswick County property taxes due

    BOLIVIA—Have you paid your 2011 property taxes yet? If not, you have until Thursday, Jan. 5, to pay your taxes before interest begins to accrue.

    “The last three days of last week and the four days this week are our busiest times in the tax office,” Brunswick County Revenue Collector Ken Perry said this week.

    “We are on target with our 2011-2012 collections, thanks to the citizens and businesses who have paid their taxes, especially during these difficult economic times,” Perry said.

  • Beacon looks back on 50 years

    Editor’s Note: This is the first in a year-long series reflecting on the history of The Brunswick Beacon. Each month we will bring readers a glimpse into the past.

     

    The new year marks a time of reflection for The Brunswick Beacon. With lots of changes over the years, 2012 marks 50 years of continual news coverage for the newspaper in Brunswick County.

  • Beacon looks back on 50 years

    If it weren’t for Jo Ann Simmons, there might not have ever been a Brunswick Beacon.

    The first edition of this newspaper was published under the name of the Shallotte Press on Thursday, Nov. 1, 1962.

    But the name Shallotte Press didn’t stick for long. A contest was launched challenging subscribers to come up with a new name for the newspaper. A $50 cash prize awaited the winner.