Local News

  • Commissioners push for creationism as curriculum

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County Commissioners Chairman Bill Sue and commissioner Scott Phillips think creationism needs to be a part of Brunswick County Schools curriculum, taught right alongside the theory of evolution.

    “Darwin started out it was a theory, and by the time he got to the sixth chapter, it was fact,” Sue said Monday at a meeting between county commissioners and school officials. “Every theory that has ever been the basis of evolution has been disproven.”

  • Brunswick Stew & Que draws largest crowd to date

    SHALLOTTE—Threats of imminent weather didn’t stop the largest crowd yet from coming to taste the best Brunswick stew.

    Saturday’s third annual Brunswick Stew & Que, sponsored by the Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce, saw its largest crowd to date with about 1,300 attendees, according to Kelly Mathews, programs and events director.

    “It’s grown since last year,” she said.

  • Superintendent says budget cuts will ultimately affect students, measurable outcomes

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County Schools officials said if commissioners choose a revenue-neutral tax rate with allowable growth, it would be the best possible solution for their funding agreement with the county.

    According to figures provided by school officials at a meeting between school and county officials Monday afternoon, the school system’s funding from the county would increase about $1.8 million if commissioners choose revenue-neutral with growth tax rate for the 2011-2012 fiscal year.

  • Commissioners get glimpse of upcoming budget, tax rate

    BOLIVIA—After commissioners charged county manager Marty Lawing with crafting a budget using a tax rate less than revenue-neutral, commissioners received a glimpse of what the upcoming fiscal year’s budget could look like.

    At a budget workshop Tuesday afternoon, commissioners were given an update on the budget for the 2011-2012 Fiscal Year, which begins July 1.

    “This is not intended to be a recommended budget by any means,” county manager Marty Lawing said, adding it was more of a “preliminary working draft.”

  • Experienced DSS director takes the helm as county director

    BOLIVIA—Patty Connelly knew she wanted the job before there was even an opening for a social services director in Brunswick County.

    An experienced social services director with both public- and private-sector social services experience, Connelly knew she wanted to lead Brunswick County’s social services department.

    When a director’s vacancy was finally announced last October, she fought for what she described as “her” job—winning the favor of the five members of the county’s social services board.

  • Commissioners throw support behind DSS, health boards consolidation bill

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County commissioners threw their support behind Senate Bill 433, which would allow counties to consolidate human services boards, such as health and social services, to one board.

    Commissioners approved a resolution in support of the measure four votes to one, with commissioner Charles Warren dissenting. Warren also serves as chairman of the county’s social services board.

    Senate Bill 433, the local human services administration bill, was introduced March 29 by state Sen. Fletcher Hartsell Jr., R-Concord.

  • Your right to know: A look back at five weeks of sunshine

    For the past five weeks, The Brunswick Beacon has brought you stories and information about public records and open meetings laws in North Carolina.

    We focused on the public’s right to know, and what you’re entitled to at every level of government, from Town Hall to halls of the Capitol.

    We also told you how various local agencies responded to our requests for public information.

  • VA awards contract for Wilmington super clinic

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recently awarded a lease contract for Wilmington’s proposed “super clinic,” bringing state-of-the-art care to Southeastern North Carolina’s veterans.

    The 80,000-square-foot-plus super clinic will replace the existing 9,500-square-foot Wilmington clinic when it opens in 2013.

    The clinic will offer primary care, mental health services, optometry, audiology, podiatry and neurology.

  • Audio, memo revealing in Calabash

    CALABASH—A 13-minute audio version of a property discussion from town commissioners’ March 8 closed meeting provides more details than a print version released last week.

    A compact disk recording of the meeting provided to The Brunswick Beacon by interim town administrator/town clerk Kelley Southward, along with a March 4 memo issued to commissioners prior to the meeting, indicates the board was more aware of the discussion at hand than official statements claim.

  • Bidding under way to get Brunswick's goats

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—The days may be numbered for wild goats roaming three spoil islands along the Intracoastal Waterway.

    The state has begun accepting bids “to dispose of feral and domestic goats and livestock” by June 17 on Andrew, Alexander and Abigail Grace islands, which are on the seaward side of the Intracoastal Waterway near Ocean Isle Beach.