Local News

  • School board members approve first phase of capital outlay project

    At a finance committee meeting Tuesday night, members of the Brunswick County Board of Education voted unanimously to approve Phase I of the district’s capital outlay projects for the 2010-2011 fiscal year. The projects total $1,108,600.

    Because of uncertainties in funding sources, the project list was divided into two parts, Freyja Cahill, executive financial officer, said. School officials ask money for Phase I be appropriated during the 2009-2010 school year so work can begin when school is not in session.

  • Spring into fitness during spring break

    BOLIVIA—Students not leaving town on spring break can spend the week swimming, playing sports and games and making arts and crafts at Spring Into Fitness at the Dinah E. Gore Fitness and Aquatics Center on the Brunswick Community College campus.

    Targeted for children ages 5-12, the camp will run from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. April 5-8. Rhonda Schilawski, center director, said it would resemble the Fitness for Fun summer camp and give students a chance to try a variety of activities.

  • VIDEO INCLUDED: Thirty-seven voters booted from county's voter registration rolls

    BOLIVIA—Thirty-seven registered voters on Bald Head Island won’t be casting their ballots this May, or anytime soon in Brunswick County, after the Brunswick County Board of Elections voted to remove them from the county’s voter registration rolls.

    The eligibility of two more voters will be heard at the board’s next meeting, at 3 p.m. April 20 at the county board of elections.

  • Voter registration: What you need to know

    Voting is a way to express your rights as an American, and the first step toward choosing your leaders in the voting booth is registering to vote.

    To register in Brunswick County, a person must be a U.S. citizen and a legal resident “domiciled in Brunswick County and North Carolina” for 30 days by the date of the next general election day, according to the Brunswick County Board of Elections.

  • What you would have missed

    It’s been a busy year for Beacon reporters.

    From a small-town commissioner saying the town got “snookered” over the town administrator’s fictitious resume, to the board of education getting schooled on e-mail as a public record, there has been no shortage of compelling stories brought to our readers by the N.C. Public Records Law, and the First Amendment.

    This week, March 14-20, is Sunshine Week. Organized by the National Society of Newspaper Editors, Sunshine Week focuses freedom of information, open government and access to public records.

  • County elections board answers to state board and laws



    The chain-of-command is pretty simple and clear-cut for the Brunswick County Board of Elections.

    “We answer to our board, and the board answers to the state,” board director Greg Bellamy said.

    The existence of county-level elections boards throughout North Carolina and rules governing them are spelled out in state laws, specifically N.C. Chapter 163-30.

  • Judicial sunshine: Access to courts and public court documents in North Carolina

    “Sunlight is said to be the best disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman,” former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis said more than 75 years ago.

    Brandeis’ words are just as powerful today as in 1933, and are backed by the U.S. and North Carolina Constitutions.

    Article 1, Section 18, of the N.C. Constitution states, “All courts shall remain open.”

  • North Carolina Public Records Law: Property of the people

    Public records, by law, are property of the people, and the law requires the people have access to what is theirs.

    Chapter 132 of the North Carolina General Statutes governs what documents government agencies must make available to the public.

    The law clearly states everyone, not just the press, have access to public records. But you have to know what records are public before seeking access. The general rule of thumb is this: All documents are public unless the agency can prove by law that they’re not.

  • Shallotte board retreat: Aldermen take steps toward vision plan

    Shallotte aldermen want to come up with a process for implementing the vision plan adopted two years ago. The plan will be used to facilitate future improvements to Main Street and the downtown business district.

    That was one of the main topics of discussion at last week’s town daylong board retreat to discuss future projects.

    Town planning director Allen Serkin told board members the town needed “one or two more levels of specificity” to put the plan’s goals into place.

  • Aldermen want Sunnyside School building for a community meeting place

    Should the restored Sunnyside School building in Shallotte be a town museum, a community meeting room or a combination of both?

    Town aldermen said at last week’s board retreat the town should definitely use one of the two main classrooms as a meeting room to rent out to the public, although the Save Old Sunnyside Committee seems to have other ideas.