Local News

  • NEW VIDEO: Brunswick Beat for March 30, 2011

     Brunswick Beat is a video newscast created by the news team of The Brunswick Beacon in a partnership with ATMC-TV Cable Channel 3.

    This is the premiere episode for March 30, 2011.

    You can also watch this on ATMC-TV Cable Channel 3 each Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening at 7:30 p.m.  

  • Too good to be true

    Don’t let a thief steal your identity or scam you out of money.

    During the Brunswick County Community Watch’s March meeting on Monday, Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Bert Reaves with the crime prevention unit spoke about ways to prevent identity theft and scams as well as the importance of serial numbers.

  • Do you have money waiting for you?

    Do you have money that you don’t know about?

    It could be like winning the lottery, only without purchasing a lottery ticket.

    The state of North Carolina Department of the State Treasurer is holding nearly $400 million in unclaimed money. Some of it could be yours.

    As of March 29, 2011, there were 1,746,697 unclaimed properties in the state. A full listing of unclaimed properties is available online at www.nctreasurer.com.

  • New traffic pattern in Shallotte

    SHALLOTTTE—The Smith Avenue extension project, now at least three months past its projected completion date of December 2010, is reportedly 72 percent complete, according to a progress report published on the N.C. Department of Transportation’s (NCDOT) website.

    This weekend a new traffic pattern emerged in Shallotte.

  • Mandatory direct deposit could save enough for one teacher position

    BOVLIA—If Brunswick County Commissioners adopt a less than revenue-neutral tax rate, Brunswick County Schools could receive less county funds than expected.

    According to figures provided by Brunswick County school officials, an estimated $1.5 million less in county dollars brings the school system’s estimated shortfall to about $7 million for the 2011-2012 fiscal year. 

  • Technology increasing too quickly for school infrastructure

    BOLIVIA—As more technology becomes available to Brunswick County Schools, the closer the school system is to reaching its power limit.

    During the Brunswick County Board of Education operations committee meeting Tuesday, Leonard Jenkins, technology director, said 75 to 80 percent of classrooms are equipped with 21st Century technology equipment—laptops, document cameras, LCD projectors and interactive writing tablets.

  • Funding for multimedia equipment steers school system away from TVs

    BOLIVA—The Brunswick County school system is moving away from the use of TVs in the classrooms.

    Instead, computers will soon be able to function as TVs, eliminating the need for any future TV purchases.

  • Staggered school start times could save system $500,000

    The bells may ring at different times next year at Brunswick County schools.

    In an effort to reduce a $6 million budget deficit, Superintendent Edward Pruden has proposed staggered start times for elementary, middle and high schools.

    “We’re having to take a look at everything very carefully, and we’re trying to identify ways that we could save substantial amounts of money without impacting the classroom,” Pruden said Monday afternoon.

  • Warren a no-show at censure hearing

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County Commissioner Charles Warren was a no-show at his censure hearing Monday evening.

    But, as they say, the show must go on, and commissioners unanimously approved censuring Warren.

    The censure hearing was to determine if Warren was in violation of the county’s code of ethics—which they determined that he was—for not stepping down as chairman of the county’s Department of Social Services Board.

  • County administration looks to cut costs to balance $6 million-plus budget shortfall

    BOLIVIA—Could a four-day workweek be in Brunswick County employees’ future for the upcoming fiscal year?

    Though Brunswick County Manager Marty Lawing called the proposal “pretty radical,” commissioners seemed to like the cost-saving measure when Lawing presented the measure at commissioners’ two-day budget retreat last week.

    Lawing said converting to a four-day workweek would save the county in energy costs, and employees on rising fuel costs.