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Local News

  • More than 100 turtles emerge from last loggerhead turtle nest at Holden Beach

    Wave after wave of baby loggerheads—104 in all—made a mad dash to the ocean Friday night.

    It was the last nest of the 2010 sea-turtle season on Holden Beach.

    “This is so awesome,” said Jenny Kreider, who came with Mandy Overmeire from Meadville, Pa. “We’ll have to write it in our guest book. This is the last night of our vacation, so it’s the perfect ending.”

  • A Triple Crown kind of year for turtles at Holden Beach

    Holden Beach Turtle Patrol volunteers must feel like they just won the Triple Crown.

    Leatherback, loggerhead and green turtles all hatched on the island and made it safely to sea.

    The final tally showed 3,118 baby turtles hatched and were released to the ocean—out of 3,502 eggs laid this year, according to turtle patrol record keeper Ken Clagett.

    The 59 baby leatherbacks emerged on Aug. 5 from the first-known leatherback nest on Holden Beach. More than 200 people watched.

  • DSS board calls emergency meeting to name interim director

    Forty-six days after suspending Social Services Director Jamie Orrock, the Brunswick County Board of Social Services called an emergency meeting to hire an interim director Tuesday.

    After a closed session to discuss “personnel” at the emergency meeting Tuesday afternoon, board members unanimously appointed Neil Walters of North Myrtle Beach, S.C., to serve as interim director.

    Board attorney Gary Shipman said he did not know how much the county would pay Walters while he served as interim director, but said it was in the $7,000-per month range.

  • Town looks at drainage issue while repairs begin on Scotland Street house

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—Repairs for damage to a Scotland Street house property owners believe stems from dredging and flooding following a recent storm will cost more than $10,000.

    While town officials cannot offer much help for the private property repairs, they are taking a closer look into the flooding issue.

    Jim and Kim Brown of 30 Scotland Street said they have repaired four sinkholes against their backyard sea wall since the town dredged the concrete canal about a year and a half ago.

  • CRC votes to continue with sandbag limit enforcement

    The N.C. Coastal Resource Commission (CRC) has decided to resume enforcement a current policy regarding sandbags as temporary erosion control devices.

    According to a press release from Division of Coastal Management (DCM), the enforcement will lead to removal of sandbags that “have exceeded time limits outlined in commission’s rules, and are not covered with sand and vegetation.”

    A moratorium in accordance with Session Law 2009-479 had previously postponed enforcement of sand bags with expired limits, but it expired Sept. 1.

  • Board of education votes for set salary, mileage in 1990s

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County Board of Education members once received a base salary and per diem of $35 per meeting, a similar setup to a practice changed this week by Brunswick County Commissioners.

    But the board of education voted to change their practice more than a decade ago.

    Board chairperson Bud Thorsen said when he was on the board during the mid- to late 1990s when board members unanimously voted against the per diem and adopted a flat base salary and in-county mileage allotment.

  • Annual CIS figures show thousands helped by services

    Communities in Schools of Brunswick County Inc. (CIS) has released statistics from 2009-2010 that show its programs and services have helped thousands of children and families in Brunswick County during the past year.

  • The true cost to be governed: Are commissioners drunk on spending?

    Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of stories about how much Brunswick County Commissioners earn through salaries, per diem and mileage reimbursements, FICA contributions, health insurance contributions, life insurance contributions, credit card transactions and discretionary funding at commissioners’ disposal.

    Financially, Brunswick County Commissioners have begun to cut themselves off.

  • Public reacts to commissioners’ spending

    BOLIVIA—The only things missing were the pitchforks.

    At Monday night’s county commissioners meeting, a standing-room-only crowd filled county commissioners’ chambers, most of the residents on hand for the decision about commissioners’ spending.

    The three people who addressed commissioners all had one thing in common—they were disappointed in commissioners’ spending and the policy, which has allowed commissioners to more than double their salaries through per diem and mileage reimbursements.

  • Commissioners nix discretionary funding

    BOLIVIA—After approving a new compensation policy at their meeting Monday, which raises commissioners’ base salaries in lieu of their previous practice, in which they earned $50 per meeting plus local mileage reimbursements, commissioners nixed their discretionary funding accounts.

    They unanimously agreed to eliminate their discretionary funding in the waning moments of a meeting where they received public criticism for their spending practices.