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Local News

  • 2008 Sunshine Week coverage
  • North Carolina stimulus funding: more questions than answers

    RALEIGH—North Carolina is slated to receive a $6.1 billion share of the recently approved $787 billion included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

    But exactly how and when the money will be spent has yet to be determined.

    “We do not have all of the requirements set out by federal agencies,” Chrissy Pearson, Gov. Bev Perdue’s press secretary, explained.

  • Insurance commissioner asks legislators to reject bills

    RALEIGH—If North Carolina Insurance Commissioner Wayne Goodwin threw the first punch, coastal legislators wasted no time hitting back.

    On Monday, Goodwin issued a letter to members of the North Carolina General Assembly, Gov. Bev Perdue and members of North Carolina’s Congressional delegation urging legislators to reject bills introduced in the state House and Senate, which propose capping homeowners’ insurance at current rates.

  • The other side of the argument: N.C. Rate Bureau justifies rate setting

    For months, county commissioners, state legislators and local officials have been hammering the North Carolina Department of Insurance and the North Carolina Rate Bureau over increases approved for homeowners’ insurance rates in coastal counties.

    In December 2008, former insurance commissioner Jim Long approved a 29.8 percent increase to homeowners’ insurance rates in Territory 42, which includes Brunswick County. While Long ordered the 29.8 percent increase, the rate bureau requested a 69.8 percent increase for Territory 42. The rates take effect May 1.

  • Unique items, low overhead make antique mall attractive to buyers, dealers

    Editor’s note: This is the third installment in a series of stories about local small business owners trying to make it in a challenging economy.

    SHALLOTTE—They know they’ll never get rich, but self-described “compulsive shoppers” like Melinda Johnson and Ella Oliveira have an outlet for their passion—The Fancy Flea Antique Mall on U.S. 17 Bypass.

    The mall contains 6,000 square feet stocked with old bottles, dolls, books, vintage fabrics, furniture, coins, dishes and even some new gift items.

  • County ponders animal shelter management

    BOLIVIA—County officials have been meeting with animal group representatives to discuss future management of the Brunswick County Animal Shelter.

    Don Yousey, director of the Brunswick County Health Department, recently said animal rights people are interested in taking over management of the shelter.

    At present, the health department oversees animal services and the shelter on Green Swamp Road.

    Yousey, speaking at a Feb. 9 health board meeting, said it might be beneficial if an animal group took over the shelter’s day-to-day management.

  • Beacon Web site add interactive Readers' Forum

    The Brunswick Beacon has added an interactive Readers' Forum to its Web site. Registered users can now log into the forum and join discussions on recent issues written about by Beacon staff, start their own discussions regarding local issues or concerns, share news tips or just read what others have to say about everything Brunswick County.

  • Third Annual Beacon Health Expo set for Saturday

    Get your medical questions answered and your health screened for free at the Third Annual Brunswick Beacon Health Expo this Saturday, Feb. 28, at the West Brunswick High School gymnasium.

    The event is from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., and admission is free.

  • Back from Iraq

    When a half dozen reporters, photographers and videographers gathered in Mandi Young’s first-grade Belville Elementary School classroom Thursday afternoon, students were told they were there to interview Karen Coughlin, Young’s teacher assistant who was recently named Brunswick County Teacher Assistant of the Year.

    First-grader Brennan Kosmeh had no idea the media was really there for him and to capture his reaction to a big surprise.

  • Troopers target teen drivers in 'Operation Drive to Live'

    SHALLOTTE—State troopers will be targeting teen drivers this week as part of the statewide initiative “Operation Drive to Live,” to reduce traffic collisions involving teenage drivers.

    Beginning Feb. 23 and continuing until March 1, state troopers and other local law enforcement agencies will amp up patrols, especially around area high schools, from 6 a.m.-5 p.m. each day.

    Traffic collisions are the leading cause of teenage deaths in North Carolina, trooper J.L. Reeves explained, adding 125 teens were killed on North Carolina highways in 2008.