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Local News

  • Gazebo draws objections in Carolina Shores

    CAROLINA SHORES—As a town committee investigates costs, a resident questioned why the town wants to have a park and gazebo.

    Resident Jim Parsch, speaking at the town board of commissioners meeting last Thursday, said it’s a waste of taxpayers’ money.

    He said he doesn’t believe people are going to use the facilities and that it ought to be something that’s put on the ballot and voted on.

  • An overview of public records laws in North Carolina

    Reporter’s note: To view the public records law, chapter 132 of the North Carolina General Statutes, visit the North Carolina General Assembly website, www.ncleg.net, and click on “general statutes” under the shortcuts listing on the right.

    What do property tax records, a sex offender registry and campaign finance reports have in common?

  • Campaign finance reports at all levels of government are public record

    If you want to know who’s bankrolling your favorite (or least favorite) candidate, all you have to do is ask—it’s public record.

    That’s right, campaign finance reports, which detail who’s giving money to whom, and who’s spending money on what, are public record, available for public inspection.

    You just have to know where to look.
    Here in Brunswick County, campaign finance reports for county and municipal candidates are kept at the Brunswick County Board of Elections, Building H, at the county complex in Bolivia.

  • The true cost of public records: What agencies can (legally) charge for public documents

  • How to make a public records request and what to do if you’re denied
    1. First, it’s important to identify the correct agency that is the custodian of the information you’re seeking. It’s also important to be specific about exactly what it is you are seeking.
  • The true cost to be governed: A look at the total (and hidden) county personnel costs

    There are numbers, and then there are the real numbers—how much something really costs.

    In honor of Sunshine Week, the national initiative organized by the National Association of News Editors focused on freedom of information and the public’s right to know, The Brunswick Beacon is shining the light on the true cost to be governed at the county level.

    We requested information about the true cost to fund Brunswick County personnel and commissioners—from salaries to benefits, from clothing allowances to car stipends.

  • 2011 values sent to property owners

    If you haven’t already done so, check your mailbox.

    You might find your 2011 property values waiting for you.

    The 2011 countywide property revaluation is complete, and Brunswick County Tax Administrator Tom Davis said Brunswick County’s value dropped 29 percent, down from $30.9 billion in 2010 to $22 billion in 2011.

    Bolivia, Leland and Northwest fared best in revaluation, with drops of 5 percent, 10 percent and 9 percent respectively.

  • Stone Chimney Road re-opens to traffic

    SUPPLY—After months of being closed for bridge repairs and several delays, Stone Chimney Road has re-opened to traffic.

    According to the North Carolina Department of Transportation, Stone Chimney Road in Supply re-opened for traffic last week after being closed for road work and bridge repairs since Aug. 4, 2010.

    Originally scheduled to re-open in November 2010, the project was pushed back until December 2010, then again until February 2011. Recently, DOT officials said work would be completed by March 31.

  • Waccamaw School remembers Ash family of four killed in wreck

    ASH—The Waccamaw School community sent dozens of paper angels tied to balloons into the sky last Friday morning in memory of the Ash family of four that was killed in a head-on wreck that involved a Brunswick County school bus.

    According to Sgt. T.T. Daniels of the N.C. State Highway Patrol, Joshua Steed Williams, 31, of Ash, was driving his passenger vehicle west on Camp Branch Road near Makotoka Road and N.C. 211 when he crossed the centerline and collided with a school bus just before 4 p.m. Tuesday, March 8.

  • Holden Beach commissioners to buy 18 second-row lots

    HOLDEN BEACH—Commissioners approved buying 18 second-row lots from Holden Beach Enterprises for $76,000, during their regularly scheduled meeting at town hall Tuesday night.

    Town manager David Hewett said in an interview before the meeting that a CAMA survey will be needed to find out if any of the lots are “buildable.”

    The current tax value on the property is $104,000 per lot or $1.976 million for the total, he said. However, recently a comparable lot appraised for $7,000.