Local News

  • VIDEO INCLUDED TRAILBLAZERS: Superior Court Judge Ola Lewis

    A sandy-haired toddler wiggled impatiently in his mother’s arms. Squirming, crying, she tried to soothe him, but it was obvious neither of them wanted to be where they were.

    The mother, a 20-something petite blonde in a pink shirt, stood in court before Superior Court Judge Ola Lewis during a Drug Treatment Court session last month, nervously awaiting what Lewis would say.

    Lewis sighed.

  • Comedian Bobby Collins headlines second Stand Up For Charity this Saturday

    The Shallotte Junior Women’s Club will present its second annual Stand Up For Charity benefit comedy show featuring comedian Bobby Collins at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 2, in Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College.

    Collins’ brand of humor is described as heartfelt and witty, engaging audiences with a “clever blend of characterizations and hilarious observations.”



    When Bob Grimes came back to Brunswick County in 2007 to take over as principal at North Brunswick High School, he didn’t exactly know what he was getting himself into.

    “I didn’t know a whole lot about the status of the school,” he said. “I knew by looking at the test scores they were not where they should be, or where I thought they should be. And obviously the state didn’t feel that they were where they should be, either.”



    “Everybody can rap, but it just depends on what you do with it.”

    Robert Lawson may only be 17 years old, but he knows how to bring attention to his music and has already built a fan base into the millions.

    Lawson—better known as Roblo—burst onto the music scene two years ago when he began writing, recording and producing his own songs.

    His love of songwriting stems from his introduction to poetry in fifth grade when he was a part of the Basketball Poets, a program that incorporates poetry and basketball.


    “Oh, that you would bless me and enlarge my territory! Let your hand be with me, and keep me from harm so that I will be free from pain.”

    Clarice Holden begins each day with these words. She feels the words of the Jabez prayer help keep her grounded and achieve her goals. In addition to running a women’s clothing store, Island Breeze, Holden spends her time working with mission projects overseas and helping local charities raise funds to meet needs.


    When you see Mari-Lou Wong-Chong, her petite frame is balancing a multitude of bags. “This is how I stay organized,” she said gesturing to three bags of various sizes and shapes. “Each bag represents an organization.”


    Growing up, Anita Hartsell knew many of the men in her family served in the armed forces, and she looked up to them. She didn’t know any women in the military, and if she had, she says she probably would have considered joining the service.

    But fate had other plans—plans that have allowed Hartsell to serve her country in another way—helping former military men and women in Brunswick County receive federal and state benefits they deserve.


    MIDWAY ROAD—You’ve probably seen their signs along N.C. 211: Handmade plywood emblems reading, “Stop Municipal Theft!”; “No St. James Annexation”; “On Day 8 God Made STJ: His Only Mistake.”

    Every day, a new sign with a similar sentiment seems to pop up along the corridor, and it appears some people in the area are not happy with the situation.

  • Brunswick County drops to 37th among fastest-growing counties

    Brunswick County has dropped from 28th to 37th on the U.S. Census Bureau’s latest list of 100 fastest-growing counties in the United States.

    Census Bureau numbers released Dec. 23 show Brunswick County with an estimated population of 103,160, an increase of 30,017 residents or 41 percent from 2000 to 2008. The estimate base for April 1, 2000, showed a population of 73,143.

    Census Bureau tallies estimate the top 100 counties’ growth rates through July 1, 2008.

  • Health department polls county staffers about going smoke-free

    The Brunswick County Health Department is in the midst of tallying results of a survey of county employees to determine if county property should be smoke-free, in the wake of the new state law banning smoking in restaurants and bars.

    The state’s new no-smoking law goes into effect Jan. 2.

    Right now, smoking is not allowed inside county offices and not within 50 feet of the health department due to state law.