Today's News

  • Summer season numbers down, but not as much as expected

    With vacationers tightening their belts and not spending what they used to, 2009 occupancy tax revenue was down in Brunswick County over the previous year.

    But not as much as tourism officials expected.

    “It looks better now than we thought it would last year at this time,” Brunswick County Tourism Development Authority Chairman Kemp Causey said this week. “In our budget, we said we would be down 20 percent.”

  • Fall time and the harvest moon

    In school, everyone learns about the seasons and why Earth has seasons. The school lessons talk in detail about winter and summer; however, lesson plans seem to skim over autumn and spring.

    Autumn is my favorite time of year. What is yours?

  • Plan and purchase now for a spring flower show

    The gorgeous displays of spring-flowering bulbs are already showing up in garden shops and nurseries.

    Go ahead and purchase your bulbs while the selection is still good but it’s too early to plant. Store them in the crisper of your refrigerator or in a cool, dark and dry place until you’re ready to plant.

  • Tips for hurricane, tropical storm preparedness

    Just in case a tropical storm or hurricane approaches our area, it would be nice to be prepared. This is a keeper to put on your refrigerator door for tips on how to deal with things.

    After the storm

    Clean-up is the first priority after any major storm. Here are some suggestions to help you with this task.

  • How to make room for trees in your small garden spaces

    You have decided you would like to plant a tree or two or three in your yard, but realize that you don’t have much room for a big tree. Think again, but think smaller.

    You need never to feel restricted again with the use of these small problem solvers. You can organize a small space with tall, airy trees. When we enter a space, particularly a small or intimate space, we tend to look first horizontally, then vertically.

  • Stanley-Sisk

    Dana Marie Stanley and David Alton Sisk of Raleigh were married July 18 at the Watts Farm in Ocean Isle Beach.

    The bride is the daughter of Dane and Mary Stanley of Shallotte. She was given in marriage and escorted by her father.

    The groom is the son of David and Becky Sisk of Smithfield.

    The bridal party and mothers of the bride and groom arrived by limousine to begin the service. The bride and her father arrived by horse and carriage, and he escorted her across the bridge spanning the pond and to the gazebo, where the ceremony took place.

  • Long

    Aimee Flynn and Dave Long of Shallotte announce the birth of a son, Joey Colton Long, born at 9:54 p.m. Aug. 18 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 5 pounds, 11 ounces, and measured 19 inches long. He joins a sister, Brittney, 15, and a brother, Austin, 9.

    Maternal grandparents are Lisa and Lee Harris of Shallotte and the late Donald Lee (Joey) Flynn Jr. Paternal grandparents are the late Charles B. Long and Bonnie Ward of Nakina.

  • Robbins

    Holly Maggard and Jeremy Robbins of Boiling Spring Lakes are the parents of a daughter, Kaylee Jade Robbins, born at 9:05 p.m. July 31 at UNC Hopsital at Chapel Hill.

    She weighed 4 pounds, 2 ounces and measured 17 1/4 inches long.

    She joins brothers, Jordan, 16, Dylan, 8 and Nathan, 7, and sisters, Ashley, 13, Emily 10, and Emilee, 5.

    Maternal grandmother is Melanie Maggard of Winnabow.

    Paternal grandparents are Sheila and Johnny Grainger of Supply and Barbara and Keith Robbins of Winnabow.

  • Frink

    Brandon and Camelia Frink of Ash are the parents of a daughter, Ma’Kenzy Zacaria Chae Frink, born at 8:24 p.m. Aug. 21, at New Hanover Regional Medical Center.

    She weighed 8 pounds, 1 ounce, and measured 20 inches long.

    Maternal grandmother is Angela Williams of Shallotte.Paternal grandmother is Carrie Frink of Thomasboro.

    Great-grandmother is Nedrea Williams of Longwood.

  • Creeds are powerful and essential to our lives

    There is likely no more potent a statement than one that begins with the words: “I believe.”

    Creeds are essential to our lives. They help us to formulate our thoughts, to focus on important matters and to empower our ability to change and be changed and to be transformed by truth.

    Creeds mark the starting point of our faithful responses, as well as the onset of possibilities. While they are not static or stagnant, they are also not so fluid as to be meaningless.