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Today's News

  • South boys fall in second round

    The third time wasn’t the charm for the South Brunswick High School boys’ basketball team. It was just more of the same.

    West Bladen defeated the visiting Cougars 57-43 last Thursday in the second round of the Class 2A state playoffs. It was the Knights’ third win of the season against South Brunswick.

    West Bladen led 28-18 at halftime. The Cougars cut the deficit to 36-30 at the end of the third quarter, but the Knights outscored them 21-13 in the final period.

  • Lady Trojans rally for 3-2 win in softball season opener

    West Brunswick High School’s softball team opened its season last Wednesday with a 3-2 win against visiting South Brunswick.

    The Lady Cougars scored two runs in the first inning, but West Brunswick came back with single runs in the first, second and third.

    Winning pitcher Heather Carter had six strikeouts in four innings. Carly White had five strikeouts in three innings and got the save.

    Stacy Jackson went 3-for-3 with a double and triple and Leah Fulford was 2-for-2 with a triple and run scored to lead the Lady Trojans.

  • Brunswick Wildlife: Zigged when I should've zagged!

    On the morning of the Feb. 18 total lunar eclipse, I was suddenly driven to photograph the event. Without planning and with little study, I grabbed my camera and birding scope, jumped in to my SUV, and headed to Fort Fisher’s rock seawall. I was the first to arrive around 6:30 p.m. and the last to leave around 11:30 p.m.

  • Kerr birth

    Beth McCray and Eric Kerr are the parents of a son, Dominic Anthony Kerr, born at 8:37 p.m. Feb. 18 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 8 pounds, 5 ounces and measured 21 inches long.

    Maternal grandparents are Sheila McCray of Supply and Tony McCray of Lumberton.

    Paternal grandmother is Cathy Kerr of Supply.

    Paternal great-grandparents are Jesse and Joyce Hardee of Laurinburg and Tyson Barber of Wagram. Maternal great-grandparents are W.K. and Shirley Lewis of Supply.

  • 'New and improved' plants enamor gardeners

    “New” is a great marketing campaign. Stop by the supermarket and you’ll find all kinds of “new and improved” stuff on the shelves. Gardeners are enamored with “new” just like everyone else. Take a look at your favorite garden catalog and you’ll see lots of space devoted to the new and unusual.

    During a recent visit with an old nursery friend of mine, I saw two new plants that have lots of potential for our landscapes: Taiwan cherry and Steeplechase arborvitae.

  • Trying to be healthy? Don't fall for pseudo-science

    Things are getting a bit strange in the fields of medicine and science these days, and I’m not talking about insurance premiums or co-payments.

    I’m talking about people who call themselves “doctors” and add to existing medical wisdom with their own made-up advice so they can keep making money.

    It’s not medical science. It’s marketing.

  • Here are some old-fashioned recipes just like Grandma used to make

    Remember when you were a child and grandma would spend all day in the kitchen, cooking delicious meals and desserts “the old-fashioned way?”

    Wish you could relive some of those wonderful childhood memories of grandma’s cooking? She didn’t even need to read a recipe or use a measuring spoon—she just somehow “knew” what the right amount of ingredients were. That’s what makes grandmas so great! Don’t you wish you knew how to cook like that, to smell the pies baking, to taste the delicious cookies again?

  • Continuing education courses offered at Brunswick Community College

    The Continuing Education and Workforce Development Department at Brunswick Community College offers short-term programs and classes for self-improvement, cultural enrichment and academic achievement geared towards adults seeking intellectual stimulation, community involvement and social interaction, according to Karen Ladley, public information officer.

    Many business courses are free due funding from a Small Business Center grant.

    Seniors, 65 and older, can also take many classes free of charge.

  • Diasbled dog finds her way on the agility course

    Stella can run through an agility course in about 40 seconds with few mistakes. She can run up and down the see–saw and A-frame with ease, soar over the jumps and maneuver through weave poles.

    But when it comes to making her way through a closed tunnel Stella, unlike many other dogs that perform the same tasks, gets lost because she cannot hear verbal commands.

    While most dogs listen for direction, Stella is deaf and relies on hand signals to help her run the course. Despite her disability, she runs the course with ease.

  • Tips for a healthy lawn this spring

    EDITOR'S NOTE: (Part 2 of a two–part series on lawn care)

    First and foremost, do not fertilize your lawn at this time. The Extension Master Gardener Hot Line has received several calls on lawn fertilizing. As warm season grasses are grown in this area and the grass is just now starting to break dormancy, fertilizing now is a waste of time and money.