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Today's News

  • Sweet Celia

    Celia is a full-grown gray tiger-and-white tabby who loves to dip her paws in the water can and lick your hands. To see her, call Cat Tails at 253-1375 or visit its Web site at www.cattails.org. You can visit Celia, as well as all the other cats and kittens available for adoption, at Cat Tails in the Corner Stone center at 6622 Beach Drive in Ocean Isle Beach. Visiting hours are 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays and 1-3 p.m. Sundays. Other hours are by appointment. Cat Tails is also desperate for volunteers.

  • After the holiday plant care

    Poinsettia’s keeping quality depends on several factors. Many home gardeners have no trouble keeping a poinsettia looking good through the winter, but bringing it into “flower” in subsequent years is a challenge for the best of gardeners. They are still considered actively growing even now and will need water, sunlight, and fertilizing through February.

    Pruning Camellias

  • Pre-spring lawn care, Part I

    EDITOR'S NOTE: Part 1 of a two-part series on Lawn Care

    Now is a great time for planning weed control in your lawn. There are two different kinds of weeds to consider. Winter weeds will be discussed first.

    The majority of winter weeds are annual weeds. They grow during the winter, flower and produce seeds, and die during the first hot spell in the spring.

    Now is a good time to spot spray with a herbicide such as Weed-B-Gone for Southern Lawns or Speed Zone Southern. There are several other products that will work.

  • This time of year is garden transition time

    I don’t know about all of you, but my garden really starts to irritate me this time of year. Things just aren’t happening fast enough. I’m tired of looking at the bare stems of the deciduous trees and shrubs. The ornamental grasses have received their annual buzz cut, so they’re not exactly the Jessica Simpson of the horticultural world. The daffodil bulbs are just getting started. My severely pruned buddleias are several months away from attracting a butterfly.

  • Teachers may have changes in salary payouts

    Beginning as early as the 2008-2009 school year, Brunswick County Schools’ teachers may have to do some extra financial budgeting.

    Freyja Cahill, executive financial officer, said the IRS has been restructuring deferred compensation plans since 2005, but is implementing new rules the school system must follow.

    School employees that do no work during the summer months currently have the option of receiving paychecks for either 10 or 12 months.

  • Sheriff probe taking too long

    To the editor: There appears to be something wrong here. Since early summer of last year, I have watched and read the news about a grand jury inquiry of Brunswick County Sheriff Ronald Hewett.

    Is this a witch-hunt? We are informed the grand jury is totally secretive.

    How does the public know if this could be just a political action, or some “bad person” who is trying to get even with the sheriff, for doing his job?

  • Board tables San Rio decisions

    SHALLOTTE—Developers of San Rio have asked the town board to table approval of their request for annexation and rezoning as well as an amendment to the master plan for Phase II.

    The development company, Wakefield Coastal, is planning to scale back the project, said town administrator Paul Sabiston. They are seeking new agreements with the town to make sure the approval process goes smoothly, Sabiston said.

  • Honoring a living legend

    BOLIVIA—Master Sgt. Al Banker reported for duty at U.S. Marine Corps base Montford Point on July 24, 1942—one year after African Americans were allowed to serve in the Armed Forces.

    The Louisiana native traveled from his hometown of New Orleans to Wilmington and then to Jacksonville, where he was taken to Montford Point, just outside of town.

    The African-American Marines were segregated from the white Marines and trained at Montford Point rather than Parris Island, S.C., or San Diego, Calif., where white Marines trained.

  • Hospital authority chairman, 'friend of the hospital' dies

    Brunswick County Hospital Authority Chairman H.W. “Pete” Barnette has died.

    Barnette, who has served on the hospital authority since 2001, was a Navy and Air Force veteran and a recipient of the state’s highest civilian honor, The Order of the Long Leaf Pine. He was 73 years old.

    Last month, Brunswick Community Hospital hosted a ceremonial groundbreaking near the new hospital’s future site, to honor Barnette for his contributions to the hospital and healthcare in Brunswick County.

  • Gravesites remain undisturbed

    BELVILLE—Fifteen gravesites discovered behind Belville Elementary School won’t be moved anytime soon.

    The gravesites were discovered in September when a Wilmington developer began clearing a 166-acre tract near the school and petitioned county commissioners to move the graves to a new location.

    But after residents’ fervent opposition to moving the gravesites, commissioners denied the developer’s petition.

    The developer, Hawkeswater III, petitioned the county to move the gravesites to a different location under N.C. General Statute 65-105.