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Today's News

  • West Brunswick loses back-to-back MEC games

    The West Brunswick High School varsity basketball teams lost conference games on back-to-back nights last week. West’s boys lost 65-32 Jan. 22 at Jacksonville and 66-35 on Friday at home to Hoggard.

    West’s girls lost 61-37 to Jacksonville and 61-43 to Hoggard.

    The Trojans and Lady Trojans remain winless in the Mideastern Conference. Game summaries are below.

    HOGGARD BOYS 66

    WEST 35

    Hoggard outscored West 17-5 in the second quarter in beating the Trojans 66-35 Friday.

    West dropped to 2-14 for the season.

  • South Brunswick’s boys defeat East Columbus

    LAKE WACCAMAW—Joey Hines scored 10 points and had 10 rebounds as South Brunswick won 47-39 Friday at East Columbus in a conference basketball game.

    Hines and A.J. Ferguson played stay-away-from-my-basket and stopped the Gators on two consecutive drives, allowing Ervin Hall to shoot and hit a 3-pointer to start the game. Hall finished with nine points.

    Hines, showing no effects from an ACL tear suffered last year, appeared to be jumping higher on some tap-ins and rebounds than in previous games.

  • If you’re thinking about making stew, try some beef goulash instead

    When the temperature dips into the 20s and 30s this time of year, sometimes even the teens, maybe it’s time to start thinking about making some good, slow-simmered stew on the stove.

    Using a combination of small cuts of meat (beef, pork, veal or lamb) along with bunches of carrots, celery, tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, onions and any other vegetable of your liking, and then placing them in a large covered pot and simmering them in a seasoned liquid for a long period of time would probably constitute being called a stew or a “burgoo.”

  • Cold weather update: What has it done to our gardens?

    We had a bit of excitement last week as “Old Man Winter” dusted us with snow, temperatures in the teens and lots of wind. As a southern boy born and raised in the heat and humidity, that’s pretty miserable for me, but more importantly, what has the cold weather done to our gardens?

    The short answer is not much, but our Taiwan cherry tree and camellias have suffered.

  • Pre-spring lawn care: Part I of a two-part series on spring lawn care

    Now is a great time for planning weed control in your lawn. There are two kinds of weeds to consider. Winter weeds will be discussed first.

    The majority of winter weeds are annual weeds. They grow during the winter, flower and produce seeds, and die during the first hot spell in the spring.

  • Survivor reality show for landscape plants: Why don’t plants survive?

    What kills plants? As a time of reflection of last year and for many of the years I have been involved with diagnosing plant disorders, I find plants dying mostly from being planted too deep, from under- and over-watering, and from fertilizing too much. Someone once told our class to look in the mirror to find your plant’s number one enemy. We are often the ones to kill our plants with kindness. Too much of a good thing can be bad especially when it comes to watering practices.

  • ‘Gran Torino’ is a story of redemption found in relationships

    Typically, I avoid Clint Eastwood movies. The violence disturbs me, but I was advised to see “Gran Torino” and to report my thoughts and feelings about the film. So I did. And, I was amazed at what I saw.

    The first surprise was there was a nearly full house on a Wednesday afternoon. Gray and graying heads bobbed in conversation, since we all arrived many minutes before show time. I caught bits and pieces of the varied dialogue, mostly about golf, taxes, and maladies—speech that seniors find interesting and informative.

  • Contemporary glass showcased at Sunset River Marketplace

    CALABASH—Sunset River Marketplace, an art gallery in Calabash, is featuring “Art Glass: Summerfield & Friends” through Feb. 6.

    The group showing of contemporary art glass consists of new works by Scott Summerfield, Kakie Willcox Honig and Fyreglas Studio (husband and wife team, J.J. Brown and Simona Rosasco).

  • Shallotte plans for new town park

    SHALLOTTE—A local developer has donated 10 acres for a new town park, and the board of aldermen voted unanimously Tuesday night to apply for a state grant to make the first town park a reality.

    The proposed park would include a 50-foot parking lot, a playground, a picnic shelter with four tables, four “mini fields” for soccer or other sports, a large multi-purpose field for youth football or soccer, an adult-size soccer field, a pedestrian trail, a small concession stand and restrooms.

  • No Port Southport says the numbers don’t add up

    SOUTHPORT—No Port Southport, a group of Southport-area citizens formed to stop the N.C. Ports Authority container terminal planned for the area, has done its homework.

    At a public meeting last week at the Southport Community Building, group members presented facts they investigated on their own, after seeing a business plan from the Ports Authority that did not answer their questions.