.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Leland police add community crime map program

    LELAND — The Leland Police Department has a new mapping tool for incidents and arrests that provides an online map for residents.

    Town board meeting, Council members unanimously approved Oct. 19 authorizing an agreement for the LexisNexis Accurint Virtual Crime Center with a $9,000 contract for one year.

    Police Chief Mike James said there are two parts to the program: a public access side that provides information for Leland residents, including crime rates, and the map of its own locations.

  • Brunswick County GenX levels jump

    Brunswick County test results for the GenX chemical in the water supply spiked in mid-October, but the latest samples returned to the numbers that have been reported through the summer.

    Results reported Nov. 13 by county spokeswoman Amanda Hutcheson showed water samples taken Oct. 26 with levels of 39.5 parts per trillion in the Northwest Water Treatment Plant’s raw water source, and 38.4 parts per trillion in the finished water source.

  • County to add ‘In God We Trust’ to vehicles

    Brunswick County commissioners will add “In God We Trust” to all county vehicles.

    A one-and-a-half-inch sticker will be placed under the county seal, which is on the driver and passenger doors, of each county vehicle.

    Commissioner Marty Cooke requested a discussion to add the national motto to all county vehicles at the Oct. 16 county board meeting.

    The issue was tabled until November for county operation services director Stephanie Lewis to determine a design and cost for the addition.

  • District court docket for Oct. 30, 31 and Nov. 1, 2 and 3

    The following cases were adjudicated over five days of District Criminal Court on Oct. 30, 31 and Nov. 1, 2 and 3 in Bolivia.

    Codes: PG, pleaded guilty; PNG/NG, pleaded not guilty, found not guilty; PNG/G, pleaded not guilty, found guilty; BCDF, Brunswick County Detention Facility; NCDOC, North Carolina Department of Correction.

     

    Monday, Oct. 30

    Judge Scott Ussery presided over the following case with prosecutor Troy M. Cronk and courtroom clerk Kimberly Gonzalez:

  • Fresh versus frozen

    When it comes to eating fruits and vegetables, more is certainly better. Current research out of the United Kingdom is saying that we need even more than the recent U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommend. Their study suggests 10 servings of fruits and vegetables every day can really go a long way toward reducing risk of early death and chronic illness.

    But, how in the world can you eat that many? Or maybe a better question would be, how can you afford that many? One easy answer: Go for frozen.

  • Can cats eat yogurt?

    “Please tell me my kitty is not going to VOMIT OR SEIZURE OR … SOMETHING REALLY BAD!”

    The voice on the phone couldn’t sound any more distraught — or deafening.

    “I think she only licked a little, but she’s SO TINY! Is she going to LIVE?”

    By now you’re probably thinking the caller’s cat had drunk cyanide, gasoline or nerve gas. You’d be wrong.

    “What flavor was the yogurt?” I calmly inquired.

  • George Inman celebrates 81st birthday

    Pastor Stephen Nobles and the Sunshine Sisters of New Britton Baptist Church in Ash honor the 81st birthday of George Inman, who was born Nov. 1, 1936.

  • Semper Fi: What does it mean to be always faithful?

    By Linda Arnold

     

    I didn’t know Marine Pvt. Paul Jamison.

    I didn’t know this Vietnam veteran served his country from the age of 19 when he joined the Marine Corps.

    Pvt. Jamison passed away not long ago.  “After an extensive search, there are no known survivors,” said a line from his obituary.

    His story was circulated on social media, with a call to action to stand up for this veteran. The story touched me deeply when I read it on a Thursday afternoon before his burial service.

  • What is this mystery plant?

    By John Nelson

     

  • Hollies for year-round garden interest

    By Sam Marshall

     

    Current horticultural trends have, unfortunately, relegated hollies to an afterthought in coastal gardens, doomed forever to be hacked into little green meatballs and left to survive in the most inhospitable of environments. At best, hollies are used primarily as background filler plants for showier trees and shrubs, or worse, ignored altogether. But with their bright red berries, their diverse forms and foliage and their tough-as-nails habit, hollies deserve a prominent place throughout our coastal landscapes.