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Today's News

  • County unemployment rate drops to 6.4 percent

    The Brunswick County unemployment rate dropped for the first time in five months to 6.4 percent for February.

    Unemployment numbers have increased for Brunswick County since the September 2017 rate hit 4.9 percent, rising steadily to 5.2 percent in October, 5.8 percent in November, reaching 6.1 percent in December then starting 2018 by jumping to 6.9 percent in January.

    A year-to-year comparison showed Brunswick County’s unemployment rate was 6.7 percent in February 2017.

  • You decide: Can we reduce invisible unemployment?

    By Dr. Mike Walden

    Guest Columnist

    We’ve seen great improvement in reducing unemployment in the nation and North Carolina in recent years. Many economists think the most frequently cited jobless rate could fall below 4 percent this year. Indeed, there is already talk of the labor market being at “full employment” and an increasing number of companies are citing problems of finding qualified workers as their biggest problem.

  • District 17 House update

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    Last week in General Assembly, we met in committees or traveled to

    meetings almost every day and welcomed the new super cranes to the Port of Wilmington.

  • A volunteer extraordinaire

    By Mike O'Hare

    Guest Columnist

    April is National Volunteer Month. Celebrating those who donate their time to help their communities and their fellow man has its origins in National Volunteer Week, which President Richard Nixon created by executive order in 1974.

  • District court docket for March 26, 28 and 29

     

    The following cases were adjudicated over three days of District Criminal Court on March 26, 28 and 29 in Bolivia.

    Codes: PG, pleaded guilty; PNG/NG, pleaded not guilty, found not guilty; PNG/G, pleaded not guilty, found guilty; BCDF, Brunswick County Detention Facility; NCDOC, North Carolina Department of Correction.

     

    Monday, March 26

    Judge C. Ashley Gore presided over the following cases with prosecutor Troy M. Cronk and courtroom clerk Kimberly Gonzalez:

  • Roasted vegetables are the perfect side dish for any meal

    You cannot go wrong with roasted vegetables. They are the perfect side and make the best leftovers for a quick lunch the next day. Once you’ve tried roasting vegetables like beets, carrots, sweet potatoes, cauliflower, peppers, onions or asparagus, you’ll be serving them more often than not.

  • Differences of opinion welcome, encouraged

    In last week’s edition, we published a letter to the editor from a writer upset with all the press opponents to seismic testing and offshore drilling were getting, accusing the Beacon of catering to environmental extremists.

    The writer expressed his opinion in a letter that conformed to our letters to the editor policy, so we published it. By my count, it marked at the time the sixth letter to the editor we received and published this year that expressed support for seismic testing and offshore drilling, contrary to the Beacon’s editorial position.

  • Terry graduates from basic training

    Air Force Airman Jonathan G. Terry, son of John R. Terry and Stacy Wallace of Oak Island, has graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland in Texas.

    Terry completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills.

    Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

  • What is this mystery plant?

    By John Nelson

     

    A swamp is sort of like Rodney Dangerfield: not much respect, at least from most people. Most folks tend to think a swamp is nothing but scary wet place, dark and gloomy, a den of nothing but danger and the stuff of bad dreams. All those critters and mosquitoes. And quicksand. Don’t forget the quicksand!

  • County’s child poverty rate is alarming, unethical

    Reasonable people understand children

    are not responsible for the conditions into which they are born: healthy or diseased, wealthy or poor, cherished or forgotten.

    The most recent report released March 28 by NC Child shows more than half — 55.4 percent — of Brunswick County children continue to live in “poor or near poor” homes.

    Myriad studies and ample research has shown us how important it is to nurture children, especially early in their development.