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Today's News

  • K-9 Enforcement Team roundup

    The Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office recently launched its newest law enforcement initiative, the K-9 enforcement team.

    The team, comprised of five K-9 officers and their dogs, is similar to the sheriff’s office community policing program, which targets areas with high crime and drug activity, but the K-9 enforcement team is its own patrol division.

    The K-9 enforcement team answers calls, conducts driver’s license checkpoints and assists with other agencies when K-9s are needed.

  • WBHS student newspaper wins four state awards

    The West Wind, West Brunswick High School’s student-produced newspaper won four awards from the annual North Carolina Scholastic Media Association, a statewide contest awarding excellence in school and sports news reporting, advertising and production of student produced publications.

    The newspaper was awarded with the “Newspaper of Honor” award, which was previously called an “achievement” award.

    Chandler Inions, who will serve as this year’s editor, won third place in sports journalism for his sports column “Tobacco Road.”

  • County adds second DARE officer

    Two new faces will be roaming the halls of Brunswick County middle schools this year—DARE officers Adam Stanley and Bradley Huggins.

    County commissioners on Monday approved the addition of a seventh-grade DARE program at Brunswick County middle schools at the request of the board of education.

    Fifth-graders in Brunswick County have been through the DARE program since 1992, but this the first time seventh-graders will go through the program.

  • Schools reorganize bus routes to become more fuel efficient

    The cost of gas may greatly affect a family with one or two vehicles, but Brunswick County Schools has 161 buses that use about 1,700 gallons of fuel every day.

    To help offset the cost, the district has reworked a few bus routes and stops, hoping to use the district’s fuel as effectively and as efficiently as possible.

    Steve Miley, executive director of operations, said there were 6,400 rides last year and about 4,000 stops. About 10 percent of the routes were affected in this year’s cleanup.

  • School to host fundraiser based on popular game show

    Local community leaders will try and prove they are smarter than students at The Evelyn Smith Wray Village School when they participate in “Are You Smarter Than a Village Schooler?” a fundraiser based on the popular TV show “Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader?”

    Twelve local figures will compete against fifth- and sixth-graders from The Evelyn Smith Wray Village School during the event at 6 p.m. Sept. 13 at Odell Williamson Auditorium.

  • Beachgoers, team try to save whale that came ashore on Holden Beach

    HOLDEN BEACH—A huddle of humans placed wet towels and poured water on a pygmy whale that stranded itself on Holden Beach Saturday morning.

    Seeing the stranded whale was a rare experience for the two dozen people clustered around the sea mammal.

    Despite efforts to save the whale by beachcombers and the University of North Carolina at Wilmington Marine Mammal Response Team, the male whale died enroute to a veterinarian.

  • Shallotte planning board recommends request approvals

    SHALLOTTE—The town planning board has recommended board of aldermen approval of several projects.

    At last week’s regular meeting, the board recommended approval of the following:

    •Preliminary plat for Wisteria Place, a 41.16-acre project off Village Point Road. The project is planned to include 89 single-family homes, and the average size of the building site would be about 8,200 square feet.

  • Raising fence heights raises issues in Sunset Beach

    SUNSET BEACH—The town planning board is discussing whether to allow fence heights to grow from 4 to 6 feet.

    Town building inspector Jeff Curtis said at an Aug. 28 meeting one problem with the town’s current 4-foot maximum is most privacy fencing available at home-supply stores is 6 feet tall.

    “Four-foot really doesn’t give you much privacy,” he said.

    Board member Eddie Walters recalled one resident asked the town for permission to have a 6-foot fence that was denied several years ago.

  • Olympic victories unite the world, give us something to cheer about

    The Olympic Games provide a brief respite from all of the turmoil going on in the world around us.

    It’s an opportunity once every four years to focus on the truly great accomplishments of our own, and others’ countrymen and women.

    It’s a time when the political conversations (save the Edwards/Hunter drama) cease for a few weeks, and we focus on what is great about this world instead of what’s not.

  • Being a mom is a tough, but fun, rewarding job

    The dump truck rolls along the bumpy ground, spilling some of its sandy load. The driver toots the horn. I study the truck’s unique paint job—bright green cab with orange around the front fenders, and a black bumper.

    Suddenly the truck goes a little off course and crashes into my beach chair.

    “Whaaaaaa,” my son cried. “Ma-ma-ma-ma-ma,” he said, gesturing toward his truck.

    “OK, here you go baby,” I said as I set the truck beside him.