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Today's News

  • Providence Home prepares to celebrate 20th anniversary

    By Bob Lee

    Guest Columnist

    Providence Home opened its doors Nov. 19, 1997, and is the only emergency shelter for youth in Brunswick County, providing shelter, food and clothing and attending to the medical, educational, emotional, recreational and spiritual needs of several hundred Brunswick County youth.

  • District 17 House update

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    With all the committees meeting the past two weeks at the North Carolina General Assembly, it seems almost like we are in session.

    The last week in October, I had two official meetings in Raleigh, one in Carolina Shores and several political meetings back here in the district. Last week, we had one Raleigh meeting and a variety of economic and educational events.

  • On Campus with BCC: ‘Pocket facts’ to share about your community college

    By Dr. Susanne Adams

    Guest Columnist

    Each year, Brunswick Community College (BCC) publishes a brief enrollment report for the fall semester.

    This report, affectionately branded “Pocket Facts,” is used by our board of trustees, foundation directors and the campus community to share current details about the college.

  • Investigators seek information on abduction, slaying of Leland man

    Investigators are looking for more information about the Nov. 5 abduction and slaying of a Leland man.

    Melquan Hicks-Bey, 22, of Night Harbor Drive SE was taken from a home in the 1500 block of South 12th Street about 4:15 a.m. His body was found about 10 a.m. in a wooded area in Castle Hayne.

    Hicks-Bey died of multiple gunshot wounds about his body, Wilmington police spokeswoman Jennifer Dandron said.

  • Passionate people, compassionate community

    With all the letters to the editor we had in last week’s edition— 20 of ‘em — it felt like an early Christmas gift to me.

    It wasn’t because all those letters left no room for my column and, therefore, a little less work for me. No, it was because it reminded me how passionate Beacon readers are about this community we call home. You care enough to share your opinions publicly, and that makes me happy.

  • Use integrated approaches to manage pests, part 3

    By Sam Marshall

     

    In the past few weeks we have been discussing the basic tenants of integrated pest management (IPM) and the cultural, mechanical and biological tools you have available to help control garden pests. In this final part of the series, I will discuss the use of chemical controls, with a focus on pesticide safety and organic and synthetic controls.

     

    What are pesticides?

  • What is this mystery plant?

    By John Nelson

     

  • Leland Middle students study schematics of STEM on BHI

    BALD HEAD ISLAND — It’s the second day of November, but it’s warm and sunny as Leland Middle School sixth-graders stand shoulder-to-shoulder along the deck of the ferry, looking over the railing at the water below them, taking them ever closer to Bald Head Island just off the coast of Southport.

    The children, about 60 in all, are just some of the nearly 1,000 Brunswick County Schools sixth-graders who have or will make the trip to the island thanks to a grant from the Duke Energy Foundation worth $30,000.

  • Are you locked into a relationship power struggle?

     

    By Linda Arnold

    Is your primary relationship a constant struggle? Is it more about who “wins?”

    If so, you may be locked into a power struggle, due to unresolved anger. 

    Not that you scripted any of this. It’s an all too common pattern that sneaks up on couples. Before you know it, hurt feelings drag into long term frustrations that can be damaging — or even fatal — to a relationship. 

  • Union Elementary deserves recognition

    Union Elementary School received national attention recently, and for one of the best reasons: On Oct. 26, the school in Shallotte was named the 2017 North Carolina National Title I Distinguished School.

    Union principal Vickie Smith said a Title I school is one where more than half of the student population applies for and receives free or reduced lunch. She said Union has about 63 percent who apply for it.