.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • How to wash fruits and vegetables properly

    Tom Woods
    Master Gardener

    Recent reports of illness caused by fresh produce have raised awareness of the need to wash before eating. Each of the basic rules from the U.S. Department of Agriculture is “equally important,” says Robert Buchwald, environmental health supervisor with a branch of the Virginia Department of Health.

  • Don’t throw out those old recipes; rethink them

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    Holidays are the time for traditions, with foods being some of the favorite traditions of all. This may be the only time of year that some favorite family recipes are prepared. Although we love to use grandma or great-grandma’s recipes, it may be time to rethink and update some of the ingredients.

  • Dream becomes reality with hard work

    4-H has always prided itself for imparting knowledge to youth that helps them develop life skills and become productive members of society.
    In 2006, Elizabeth Mintz participated in the N.C. State Fair Youth Market Turkey Program through the help of her local 4-H office. In May of that year, she received four turkey poults that were less than two days old. She raised them until the state fair rolled into town and presented her best bird for competition, where she placed 14th in her class.

  • Interesting edibles for the garden

    There are plenty of vegetables you can grow in your garden, and not all of them are annuals. Imagine growing vegetables that require just about the same amount of care as the flowers in your perennial beds and borders­—no annual tilling and planting. They thrive and produce abundant and nutritious crops throughout the season.
    It sounds too good to be true, but there are underappreciated plants that could be used for this purpose. Perennial vegetables are perfect as part of an edible landscape plan or permaculture garden.

  • Community briefs

    Senior site menus
    Here are lunch menus for Brunswick County’s seven Senior Nutrition Sites for next week.
    Monday, Dec. 12
    Roast turkey/gravy, stuffing, peas/carrots, orange juice, biscuit/whole-wheat bread, beverage.
    Tuesday, Dec. 13
    Baked pork chop/gravy, baked beans, turnip greens, peaches, apple juice, whole-wheat dinner/dinner roll, beverage.
    Wednesday, Dec. 14
    Sloppy Joe, corn casserole, green beans, fruit cocktail, hamburger bun/whole-wheat bun, beverage.
    Thursday, Dec. 15

  • For better results, use processed cheeses for those main dishes

    Cheese has been around for centuries and is widely used throughout the world. There are many varieties and each has its own special texture and flavor. All cheese is made from milk, mostly from cow’s milk, but some special varieties are made from the milk of sheep or goats.
    Natural and

  • Education briefs

    WBHS announces honor roll
    West Brunswick High School has announced its honor rolls for the first nine weeks of the school year.
    A Honor Roll

  • And the winners are...

    This fall The Brunswick Beacon asked readers to share glimpses of what makes life in Brunswick County unique by entering the Brunswick Life photo contest. There were three age categories for adults, teens and children.

    Once again the talent and beauty of Brunswick County amazed the staff. Judging was difficult. There were many quality entries showcasing different aspects of the county. 

  • Hunters need to practice boating safety

    The Home from the Hunt campaign of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is reminding waterfowl hunters who hunt from a boat to practice boating safety and hunting safety.
    “Statistics show more hunters die from hypothermia and drowning than gunshot wounds,” said Maj. Chris Huebner, the state boating safety coordinator. “Hypothermia is the loss of body heat and, left untreated, can prove fatal. Exposure to extreme cold, such as being in cold water or wearing wet clothes in cold conditions, can increase the chance of hypothermia.”

  • Getting down to business in Shallotte

    SHALLOTTE—There is a new mayor leading the way into 2012 for Shallotte—Sara McCullough.

    While it may be her first time serving as the town’s mayor, it’s certainly not the first time she has served the town. McCullough has been actively volunteering here for more than 10 years.

    From hanging Christmas lights and planting flowers to serving as chairman of the town’s appearance committee to public service as an alderman, McCullough knows Shallotte and plans to continue helping where she is needed.