Today's News

  • Voter registration: What you need to know

    Voting is a way to express your rights as an American, and the first step toward choosing your leaders in the voting booth is registering to vote.

    To register in Brunswick County, a person must be a U.S. citizen and a legal resident “domiciled in Brunswick County and North Carolina” for 30 days by the date of the next general election day, according to the Brunswick County Board of Elections.

  • What you would have missed

    It’s been a busy year for Beacon reporters.

    From a small-town commissioner saying the town got “snookered” over the town administrator’s fictitious resume, to the board of education getting schooled on e-mail as a public record, there has been no shortage of compelling stories brought to our readers by the N.C. Public Records Law, and the First Amendment.

    This week, March 14-20, is Sunshine Week. Organized by the National Society of Newspaper Editors, Sunshine Week focuses freedom of information, open government and access to public records.

  • Trojans beat South in eight innings


    West Brunswick coach Mike Alderson said he planned on starting senior southpaw Gavin Lane on Tuesday against South Brunswick. Lane missed practice on Monday because of an illness and was replaced in the starting lineup by Trey Brown. Brown pitched the first three innings before being relieved by Lane, who pitched five dominant innings to lead the Trojans (5-2) to a 6-5 win over county rival South Brunswick (0-3).

  • County elections board answers to state board and laws



    The chain-of-command is pretty simple and clear-cut for the Brunswick County Board of Elections.

    “We answer to our board, and the board answers to the state,” board director Greg Bellamy said.

    The existence of county-level elections boards throughout North Carolina and rules governing them are spelled out in state laws, specifically N.C. Chapter 163-30.

  • Getting a little crazy about the right to vote

    My parents had done it. My grandma had done it. Most of my teachers had done it. Now my friends were doing it. I wanted to do it, too.

    But I had to wait until I was 18. That was the age at which I could legally vote.

    My mom loved politics, and I think her love of politics probably influenced me a little. Back when she and dad were on opposite sides of the coin, the household could get pretty interesting before a big election. They often said they canceled each other out.

  • Real Women

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  • Luna-Toones

    Luna-Toones is a fun-loving pit bull girl weighing about 40 pounds (full grown) and was a year old this past July. She plays well with other dogs and people, loves to go for walks, and likes to ride in the car. She needs a home that has high-energy owners who will love her for her cute personality. Paws Place is a no-kill, nonprofit domestic animal rescue facility that provides sanctuary for unadoptable dogs and seeks loving homes for those that are. Its kennels are open 9 a.m.-noon daily.

  • West Brunswick beats Socastee in soccer

     SOCASTEE, S.C.—Mattie Tippett scored two first-half goals and West Brunswick went on to beat Socastee 3-1 in a nonconference soccer game Friday evening.

    Playing on a muddy field, West was unable to convert on its first three corner kicks but scored twice in two minutes in taking a 2-0 lead.

    Rushing in from the right side, freshman midfielder Whitney Burkes drew the defense toward her. She then crossed the ball to an unguarded Mattie Tippett, who chest-bumped the ball through the left side of the goal.

  • Judicial sunshine: Access to courts and public court documents in North Carolina

    “Sunlight is said to be the best disinfectants; electric light the most efficient policeman,” former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis said more than 75 years ago.

    Brandeis’ words are just as powerful today as in 1933, and are backed by the U.S. and North Carolina Constitutions.

    Article 1, Section 18, of the N.C. Constitution states, “All courts shall remain open.”

  • North Carolina Public Records Law: Property of the people

    Public records, by law, are property of the people, and the law requires the people have access to what is theirs.

    Chapter 132 of the North Carolina General Statutes governs what documents government agencies must make available to the public.

    The law clearly states everyone, not just the press, have access to public records. But you have to know what records are public before seeking access. The general rule of thumb is this: All documents are public unless the agency can prove by law that they’re not.