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Today's News

  • Proposed eco theme park packs potential

    If Brunswick County were to ever to become the home of a theme park, the type Rube McMullan plans to make a reality is the ideal kind.

    McMullan is using a parcel along the Shallotte River he purchased from First Bank as the springboard for what he hopes will become Shallotte River Swamp Park, opening by May 1, 2015.

  • Shallotte man faces drug charges

     A Shallotte man faces several heroin-related charges after his Friday, Oct. 10, arrest.

    Justin Hashaim Bland, 21, of Hale Swamp Road, was charged with possession with intent to manufacture, sell and deliver heroin, conspiring to sell or deliver a schedule I controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Additional charges were levied against him Tuesday, Oct. 14, including two counts of trafficking heroin and possession of a firearm by a felon, warrants show.

  • Authorities seek Bolivia woman on drug charges

     Detectives are asking for the public’s help locating a 25-year-old Bolivia woman accused of possessing heroin and a pending charge of child endangerment.

    Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office deputies are searching for Jessica Dannielle Stratton, of Mulligan Way in Bolivia, according to a Friday, Oct. 10, Facebook post from the sheriff’s office page.

  • Former Bald Head officer files federal lawsuit against village, manager

     A former Bald Head Island public safety official has filed a lawsuit in federal court claiming he was wrongfully terminated from the village in August.

    Herbert Bryant, who served as a public safety official on Bald Head Island from 2009 until his termination, filed suit against the village of Bald Head Island and its manager, Calvin Peck, Oct. 7 in United States District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina.

    According to the complaint, Bryant has demanded a jury trial to hear the case.

  • Former Cedar Grove principal takes job at central office

     BOLIVIA — The Brunswick County Board of Education approved several changes for central office staff presented by Superintendent Edward Pruden during its October monthly meeting.

    The changes were made to address two needs: leadership for the student services division and a balance in supervision of secondary education.

    “The realignment plan utilizes existing positions to accomplish these goals,” Swencki wrote in an Oct. 8 news release.

  • School districts must offer, pay for driver education

     BOLIVIA — The state is telling local school districts they have to provide driver education courses. But for the first time in the state’s history, the responsibility to pay for the program will fall on the school district’s shoulders.

    Beginning July 1, 2015, all state funding to support the driver education program will be eliminated in the Tar Heel State.

    This was outlined in Senate Bill 744, which the General Assembly passed in August. The program has been funded by the state since 1992, when the programs were first offered.

  • Freedom Fund Banquet awards champions of equality

     CAROLINA SHORES — During turbulent times, it’s up to community leaders to step up and make a difference. That’s the message Brunswick County NAACP President Bernest Hewett preached during the organization’s Brunswick County Branch No. 5452 Freedom Fund Banquet on Saturday, Oct. 11, at Brunswick Community College’s satellite campus at the South Brunswick Islands Center.

  • District court docket

     The following cases were adjudicated over three days of District Criminal Court on Oct. 1, 3 and 6 in Bolivia.

    Codes: PG, pleaded guilty; PNG/NG, pleaded not guilty, found not guilty; PNG/G, pleaded not guilty, found guilty; BCDF, Brunswick County Detention Facility; NCDOC, North Carolina Department of Correction.

     

    Wednesday, Oct. 1

    Judge Jerry A. Jolly presided over the following cases with prosecutor W. Fred Gore and courtroom clerk Kristin Cranfill:

    David S. Adams, PG improper equipment.

  • Sweet potato: the state vegetable

     Cheryle Jones Syracuse

    Family and Consumer Science Staff

    NC Cooperative Extension

    Brunswick County Center

    I just learned something new. The sweet potato is the North Carolina state vegetable. That only seems right since North Carolina is the top sweet potato producing state in the nation. Our farmers grow almost 50 percent of all the sweet potatoes in the United States.

  • What is this mystery plant?

     By John Nelson

    Such a friendly plant and so easy to please, but once you’ve got it in your backyard, it may never want to leave.

    This is one of those plants from far away, an introduced species that has actually been popular in Southeastern gardens for a good while now. It is a native of southern Asia, mostly India and China. If you start looking into it, you’ll discover that many of our favorite garden plants (in fact most of them) have their original homes somewhere else.