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Today's News

  • Bolivia Elementary announces honor roll, awards

    Bolivia Elementary School has announced its honor roll and student awards for the third nine weeks. They are as follows:

    A Honor Roll

  • What can you do? More than you think

    Thirty-four children in North Carolina died as a result of child abuse in 2006.

    That’s not just a statistic. That’s 34 people who will never go to high school, go on a first date, get married or have children of their own—34 souls that came into the world pure and full of promise for the future and who never had a chance.

  • The full flavor of pecans add a unique, rich taste to many foods

    You say PEE-can, I say pa-KAWN, or so the saying goes. However, a new national survey finds PEE-can is the overwhelming choice among Americans.

    Nearly half of all pecan consumers prefer this pronunciation of the all-American tree nut, with the rest of the nation roughly split between pa-KAWN and PEE-kawn.

    With April being National Pecan Month, now is the perfect time for all of us to start taking advantage of the versatility of pecans and reaping the health benefits at the same time.

    PECAN HISTORY

  • Follow these tips to help ensure healthy bones

    Building strong bones is a lot like building a healthy balance in your “calcium bank account.” Bones are living tissue and constantly in a state of turnover, making calcium deposits and withdrawals daily. Bones don’t come with a lifetime guarantee. They need continuing maintenance or they can weaken and break.

  • Chicks are hatching in classrooms all over the county

    Since March 11, South Brunswick Middle School teacher Michele Rau’s class has been awaiting the arrival of chicks to hatch from eggs.

    Rau, her assistant, Mrs. Jenkins, and students, Morgan Morgan, Travis Christman, Kelly Ulloa, Theresa Dagostino and Amber Mintz, have carefully turned the eggs three times a day in the incubator and studied about chickens during their class project.

    After hatching, they took care of the chicks for a few days before they were picked up by Blair Green, Extension agent, 4-H Youth Development and Livestock.

  • Roadside nursery a growing attraction in Calabash

    CALABASH—Lois Wilkinson brakes for plants, especially those she saw for sale at Carolyn’s Flowers on Persimmon Road last week.

    “I just heard about this place,” Wilkinson said, browsing the latest spring array of potted flowers and plants Calabash native Carolyn Schreiber has cultivated to sell for another season at the roadside stand in front of her house.

    “I need flowers that need a lot of sun,” Wilkinson said as Schreiber, a natural-born gardener, assisted her.

  • Bopple Race bobs back

    HOLDEN BEACH—It’s that time of year again for spring festivities, a bopple race, and an age-old question by newcomers, “What the heck is a bopple?”

    It’s the high-point event of Days at the Docks, Holden Beach’s annual salute-to-spring festival scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday under and around the Brunswick Island town’s high-rise bridge.

  • Arts & Entertainment

    Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Ticks are here; ticks are there--they're everywhere

    Seems like the ticks are trying to take over the world (at least the Brunswick County portion). If you stay outside much, these pests seem to be everywhere.

    The Extension agents are reporting what seems to be an inordinate amount of these obnoxious little creatures awaiting a meal, and that meal may be you! The Master Gardener Hotline has received calls concerning ticks. Homeowners with natural landscapes will normally have more of a problem than others.

  • Twisting vines are good alternatives to fence

    Small gardens often must rely on fencing to provide privacy. We don’t have enough room to plant large evergreens that grow wide and take up the limited space, but plain fencing doesn’t make any gardener’s heart skip a beat. To solve this problem, consider vines for foliage, flowers and a welcome softening of the stark fencing.

    Wisterias have a horrible reputation for swallowing everything in their path. For the ones from China and Japan, it is well deserved, but the American wisterias aren’t nearly as invasive.