.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Holden Beach couple gives $1.1 million to Clemson

    The College of Engineering and Science at Clemson University has received a $1.1 million gift from Samuel and Patricia Deal of Holden Beach. The money is earmarked for research on alternative energy sources.

    The announcement came at the 2008 Major Donors Breakfast recently at the Madren Center.

  • The first inhabitants of Ocean Isle Beach (10,000 B.C. to 1521 A.D.)

    The first people to live on and near Ocean Isle Beach were Native Americans who arrived here about 10,000 B.C.

    There are many Native-American arrowheads and pottery pieces in farmers’ fields around Ocean Isle. The primary tribe in the Ocean Isle Beach area was the Cape Fear Indians, but there were also a few settlements of Waccamaw, Iroquois, Catawba, Lumbee and Choctaw. All of these tribes spoke the Siouan language.

  • Despite health issues, Shallotte ceramist wins in S.C. competition

    SHALLOTTE—Shaleigh Scott has been through a lot, her sister Pam Flowers said.

    Despite numerous health problems that have kept her home-bound, Scott turned to creative pursuits to garner two first-place ribbons and a best-in-show award in the hobbyist category at the 40th Annual South Carolina Ceramics Association Show on June 13-14 in Columbia, S.C.

    Flowers convinced her younger sister to enter her work in the competition.

    “We both broke down when we realized the two pieces she entered had won,” Flowers said.

  • Residency performance Saturday at UNCW

    Wilmington-area audiences have an opportunity to witness the premiere of new works developed in residency at a gala performance of The Carolina Ballet in UNCW’s Kenan Auditorium at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 2.

    Raleigh-based Carolina Ballet, along with nearly 100 young dancers from both the United States and abroad, has been on the University of North Carolina Wilmington campus for a month-long summer residency.

  • Arts & Entertainment

    Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Old Baldy Foundation to celebrate National Lighthouse Day

    As the afternoon wears into dusk Aug. 1, pirate ships will lurk at the entrance to the Bald Head Island Harbor preparing to “invade” the island.

    It will mark the beginning of the National Lighthouse Day celebration, sponsored by The Old Baldy Foundation and Bald Head Island Ltd.

    On Aug. 1, young mates can learn to walk, talk and act like a pirate while discovering the history of pirates along the Carolina Silver Coast with Blackbeard’s Crew, a living history performance group.

  • Garden makeovers: enjoy it more; obsess over it less

    New gardeners tend to be a bit obsessive about their lawns and landscapes. Like the French and the English who copied their style, evergreen shrubs must be controlled into boxes and balls. If we have one plant on this side of the walkway, symmetry demands a repeat on the other. Expansive lawns must be immaculate, perfectly groomed and weed-free. That works pretty well if you’re Louis XIV or King George with an army of serfs to do your bidding.

  • Tips and tricks for keeping lawns healthy in July

    Whenever we have a heat wave like the ones we have been having on and off this summer, it is a good idea to take frequent breaks and replenish lost liquids as you work. We want you to enjoy your garden and not end up in the hospital. Here are a few things to do and to be looking for at this time of year:

  • July gardening: plants that can take the summer heat

    Rudbeckias (black-eyed Susans) are members of the large and diverse Asteracea family. They are native only to North America and require only minimal care.

    There are about 25 species, and they can be perennials, biennials or annuals. Most spread by rhizomes (underground stolons) eventually creating clumps that should be divided in spring or fall every four or five years. Biennials will go to seed and self sow. Most rudbeckias prefer full sun in moderately fertile, well-drained soil. They are pretty much insect and disease free.

  • Dosher Medical Plaza to open in August

    Dosher Memorial Hospital and New Hanover Regional Medical Center have announced the opening of Dosher Medical Plaza, 4222 Long Beach Road.

    This new facility will bring state-of-the-art diagnostic imaging, laboratory services and a multi-specialty center closer to the residents of Oak Island, St. James and surrounding communities.