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Today's News

  • Trojans fall to Myrtle Beach

    Two stunning first-down touchdown passes propelled the Myrtle Beach Seahawks to a 34-5 victory over the West Brunswick Trojans in a non-conference high school football game Sept. 4 at M.H. Rourk Stadium.

    The Trojans led 5-0 with seven minutes left in the half but Seahawk quarterback Everette Golson threw touchdown passes of 48 yards and 13 yards to give Myrtle Beach a 14-5 halftime lead.

    The Seahawks then controlled the second half, scoring three touchdowns on three straight possessions.

  • Scorpions scorch the Vikings

    CERRO GORDO—The North Brunswick High School football team did it again Thursday night, beating the West Columbus Vikings 22-13.

    The game was moved to Thursday night because of the scare of Tropical Storm Hanna. The game did not start out well for the undefeated Scorpions (2-0).

  • South Brunswick opens season with victory

    BOILING SPRING LAKES—The South Brunswick Cougars brought out a Civil War cannon to shoot after every touchdown Sept. 4, and they were able to do just that, beating the Class 4-A Ashley Screaming Eagles 13-7.

    The game was the first of the season for the Cougars. The cannon was fired once to wake up the crowd, and the South Brunswick chorus and show choir sang the national anthem.

  • Trojans blank Dixon, improve to 6-0

    The West Brunswick boys soccer team improved to 6-0 by beating Dixon 1-0 Sept. 2.

    The Trojans’ only goal was scored by Gilberto Gonzalez in the 57th minute. It came off a rebound off a shot by John Mendoza.

    The Trojans fired 25 shots on goal.

    “We couldn’t bury our shots,” coach Tripp Smith said.

    Part of that was attributable to not following the strategy Smith developed for the game.

    “We had a game plan,” he said. “We got away from it early and never got back to it. That upset me. We were fortunate to win.”

  • Smith Avenue extension work to begin next year

    SHALLOTTE—The building on Main Street that housed Western Auto and the former Jones Family Center for many years has been torn down in anticipation of the state’s expansion of Smith Avenue to Holden Beach Road around the building.

    Property owners are planning to put a Walgreens Pharmacy on the Jones store site, but plans have been held up since the extension project was delayed from its original construction date of 2007, Shallotte Mayor Gerald Long said recently.

    Now, it appears the new road is on schedule to be built next year.

  • 'Black Widow' sentenced to two years in federal prison

    The woman dubbed the “Black Widow” by the media will spend the next two years in federal prison.

    Sandra Camille Powers, 64, was sentenced Sept. 3 to 24 months in the Federal Bureau of Prisons, followed by one year of supervised release. Powers must also pay a $250,000 fine.

    But the woman who became notorious for, but never formally charged with, a trail of dead husbands, will serve time in prison for identity theft, not murder.

  • Fuel spill on U.S. 17

    The Shallotte Fire Department, N.C. Highway Patrol and N.C. Department of Transportation responded to a 20-gallon fuel spill on U.S. 17 at St. Brendan Catholic Church Wednesday afternoon. Crews were on the scene for three hours. A chemical tanker from Georgia suffered a ruptured saddle tank resulting from striking a ladder on the highway. A remediation company from Wilmington cleared the roadway and shoulder of any contaminants.

  • Remembering N.C.'s most determined journalist

    A salute with a cramped, arthritis-ridden writing hand for the 150th anniversary of the first publication from the man the N.C. Press Association calls the state’s most determined journalist, John McLean Harrington.

    I stumbled upon the story of this remarkable writer, reporter, editor and publisher while perusing the association’s Web site and learned his unique story.

    According to a story Michael Ray Smith, Harrington (1839-1887) produced 299 newspapers in his lifetime, and get this—all by hand.

  • The Civil War years at Ocean Isle Beach (1860 to 1865)

    Ocean Isle Beach saw a good deal of Civil War naval action between blockade-runners of the Confederacy and gunboats of the Union Navy.

    Confederate solders were stationed along Ocean Isle Beach to protect blockade-runners using Tubbs Inlet or Shallotte Inlet. If a blockade-runner had to be beached to avoid capture, the ship’s crew would frantically unload cargo while the land soldiers held off Union gunboats.

    North Carolina provided more troops to the Confederacy than any other state, and many of these soldiers came from Brunswick County.

  • Can you eat those 'fingers' on the sides of a crab's body?

    Have you ever wondered whether certain parts of foods can be eaten? When removing the broccoli florets from the stalk, have you ever wondered if you could eat the stem? (I have, so hopefully the answer is yes). Most foods must be fabricated in some manner prior to being utilized into whatever dish is being prepared. This often means breaking them down into their component parts.