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Today's News

  • Campaign under way to feed Brunswick County’s poverty-stricken children

    The Summer of NO Hungry Child is launching a campaign to raise 1,000,000 pounds of food to feed the more than 7,500 Brunswick County children existing in poverty.

    Every canned or boxed food item donated will be distributed by various churches and organizations in the county and will go directly to Brunswick County families with the greatest needs.

  • BCC tobacco-free policy to take effect July 1

    Brunswick Community College has long awaited the implementation of its tobacco-free policy, which has been in the works since 2008 when faculty senate made a formal request to the president.

  • State reaches $131K settlement over claims allegations

    Attorney General Josh Stein announced North Carolina reached a settlement with TeamHealth Holdings, as successor in interest to IPC Healthcare Inc., formerly known as IPC The Hospitalists Inc. (IPC).

    The agreement resolves allegations that IPC violated the False Claims Act by billing Medicare, Medicaid, the Defense Health Agency and the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program for higher and more expensive levels of medical service than were actually performed (a practice known as “up-coding”).

  • Leland man accused of neglecting, stealing from grandmother

    A Leland man is accused of neglecting and stealing from his grandmother.
    Edward Conner Gore Jr., 24, of Lincoln Road NE was arrested May 8 and charged with obtaining property by false pretense, first-degree trespassing, neglecting a disabled/elder resulting in serious injury, five counts of possession of a firearm by a felon and three counts of larceny of a firearm.

  • The Academy of Coastal Carolina to move high school to New Beginnings Church

    The Academy of Coastal Carolina will move grades nine through 12 to New Beginnings Church for the 2017-18 school year to accommodate future growth and expansion.

    New Beginnings, at 730 Whiteville Road in Shallotte, has a history of partnering with community organizations, according to a news release from the school.

  • With help from above, Gause helps Trojans baseball advance to fourth round

    SHALLOTTE — Garrison Gause strolled to the plate Tuesday, May 16, with his team down to its final two outs against the visitors from Orange High School in the third round of the state high school baseball playoffs.

    He knew his West Brunswick team needed a baserunner if it was going to overcome a 1-0 deficit in the bottom of the seventh inning.

    The senior catcher resorted to asking for help from his father, who died days before the state playoffs began in early May.

  • Trojans softball team advances to round four of state playoffs

    By Ed Hullings

    Beacon Correspondent

    SHALLOTTE — The West Brunswick softball team advanced to round four of state playoffs Tuesday, May 16, with a thrilling 3-2 victory over a very tough J.F. Webb team from Oxford.

    The Trojans will face No. 1 seeded Lee County on Friday night in Sanford. The Yellow Jackets have a 25-1 record and are riding a 24-game winning streak.

    “Each team we play as we get deeper into the playoffs becomes a much tougher opponent,” Trojans Coach Joe Noble said.

  • Sea turtle program at museum May 20

    Join the Museum of Coastal Carolina on May 20 at 11 a.m. as Jim and Deb Boyce will present their program, Turtle Talk — OIBSTPO Getting Ready for Summer Turtles!

    They will discuss the life cycle of sea turtles, focusing especially on the loggerhead sea turtles that nest on Ocean Isle Beach every summer. The presentation will include a 14-minute video and a question-and-answer session at the end. Learn what you can do to help protect these magnificent animals.

  • Ingram Planetarium to celebrate 15 years of stargazing

    Help celebrate Ingram Planetarium’s 15th birthday on May 20 with a free program at 7 p.m. looking back at the history of the planetarium and the advancements in astronomy that have occurred since it first opened its doors in 2002.

  • Everyone awaits the merry month of May

    It’s been a long, hard winter. Blame is placed global warming with its concomitant climate change, even on God. We’ve ached with the cold, worried over the flooding, anguished over the unusual warmth in places where cold is expected, and generally waited with more than bated breath for springtime to come — and stay. March teases us. April periodically delights, but May is the month of promise.