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Today's News

  • Some ways to make your own bee-friendly garden

    Judy Koehly
    Master Gardener
    When most people think of bees, the first bee that comes to mind is the honeybee, but this bee is only one of about 25,000 species known worldwide. In the U.S., we have almost 4,000 types of pollinating bees.
    The honeybee was adopted as North Carolina’s state insect in 1973. Not a native species, the honeybee was brought to North America by settlers from Europe. Bees native to the Carolinas are solitary bees and not subject to colony collapse.

  • PodPonics is an unusual approach to urban farming

    The local food movement is on the rise. I recently went to a sustainable agriculture conference and was introduced to our next generation of farmers. These young adults are a diverse group, full of energy and interested in implementing new ideas and techniques into the farming world.
    Nearly every aspect of our lives has seen a vast change over the last few decades. Yet the way we grow our food seems to be the one thing that has failed to evolve much at all.

  • Traffic brakes for slow-moving tortoises near Calabash

    LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—Along N.C. 179 just south of Calabash, passersby were doing double-takes—and then stopping to double-check.

    Was that a giant tortoise they just saw moving at a steady clip near the roadside?

    Yup, it was.

    People braking for the spectacle and stopping to get a closer look on a recent Sunday soon learned it was just Sunset Beach resident Randy Gallagher taking a few of his eight tortoises out for a slow-but-sure walk.

  • Ellen fought like a girl, woman and a mother

     There was one thing Ellen Wemyss Granade fought for more than life—her boys.

    All three of them—her two sons, Garrett and Eli, and her husband, Grant.

    Ellen grew up on “the hill” next door to her grandparents, aunts and uncles and cousins on a farm off of Four Mile Road in Ocean Isle Beach.

  • Community briefs

    Senior site menus
    Here are lunch menus for Brunswick County’s seven Senior Nutrition Sites for next week.
    Monday, Dec. 5
    Macaroni and cheese, diced ham, vegetable blend, orange juice, biscuit/whole-wheat dinner, beverage.
    Tuesday, Dec. 6
    Beef tips/mushrooms and noodles, spinach, applesauce, dinner roll/whole-wheat dinner roll, beverage.
    Wednesday, Dec. 7
    Barbecue pork, baked beans, fresh cooked cabbage, fresh orange, hamburger roll/whole-wheat bun, margarine, beverage.
    Thursday, Dec. 8

  • Sandwiches come in many different shapes and sizes

    The sandwiches we eat today were named for John Montagu, the Fourth Earl of Sandwich. As the story goes, he was an enthusiastic gambler and didn’t want to leave the tables to partake of dinner, so he had someone bring him some meat between a couple slices of bread. It then became common practice for others to say, “I’ll have what Sandwich is having.” Eventually, it caught on and people just started calling for a “sandwich” when they wanted meat between two slices of bread.

  • Education briefs

    Shallotte Middle honor roll
    Shallotte Middle School has announced its honor roll for the first nine weeks.

    A Honor Roll
    Sixth grade: Mia Adcock, Brian Barrett, Griffin Brown, Madison Cagle, Madeline Chandler, Hayley Giordano, Russ Gore, Madeline Jackson, Davis Julian, Ashley Oakes, Jocelyn Paolilli, Campbell Pryor, Danielle Riffel, Cierra Watts, Robin Wood.
    Seventh grade: Katherine Barnes, Nicholas Himes, Claire McNeil, Arnulfo Silva, Taye Vereen.
    Eighth grade: Quniton Churning, Shelley Hurst, John McNeil, Samuel Zeng.

  • Pottery artists getting crafty for upcoming holiday open house

    CALABASH—Greenware is drying on racks as pottery artist Vivian Swanson, seated at a sketching table, etches a mermaid into a wet, flat piece of clay she plans to fire and glaze into a plaque in the near future.

    Janet Archambault, owner of this pottery-crafting place called Stay Centered Studio, shows off assorted creative-ware made by local ceramics artists, from glazed plates, bowls and vases to still-life fruit and face-masks, called “green men,” suitable for decorating trees.

  • Smart Start gets reading grant

    Smart Start of Brunswick County has received a matching grant award from GlobalGiving for its Books for Babies in Brunswick County project.
    Books for Babies partners Smart Start’s Raising a Reader and Parents As Teachers together in a special project designed to encourage family engagement through literacy activities such as book cuddling.

  • Shallotte Lions Club offers vision screening

     SHALLOTTE—The motto is simple: See the 21st Century.

    Members of the Shallotte Lions Club are helping those in Shallotte see better; and so are other Lions clubs in the area.

    The Shallotte club recently prescreened 200 sixth-grade students at Shallotte Middle School and more than 150 second- and fifth-graders at Waccamaw School. In coming months they plan to screen students at Supply Elementary School as well as host a public screening in the Walmart parking lot.