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Today's News

  • Lunch and Learn brings emergency services, deaf and hard of hearing together

    BOLIVIA — Information about emergency services in Brunswick County is for everyone.

    That was the idea that prompted Brunswick County Emergency Services deputy director Scott Garner and Christina Bauman, North Carolina Division of Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Wilmington Regional Center community accessibility consultant, to conduct a Lunch and Learn at Brunswick Community College’s Odell Williamson Auditorium on Aug. 27.

  • Leland OKs Harrington Village incentive plan

    LELAND — Leland officials have approved a development agreement and incentive plan with the developer of Harrington Village following a public hearing that drew less than a dozen speakers at the Aug. 25 town meeting.

    Harrington Village Developer D Logan purchased 19.73 acres between Baldwin Drive and Fairview Road, including the Leland Flea Market property on Village Road.

  • CIS programs to continue at three schools, for now

    Anne Weatherford, a parent of a Southport Elementary School, heard through the grapevine Aug. 24 from another parent that Communities In Schools of Brunswick County would discontinue its fee-based before and after-school programs at Southport, Belville and Town Creek elementary schools.

    After calling CIS, Weatherford said, she learned the rumor was true and the program would not be available for students beginning Monday, Aug. 29, the first day of 2016-17 classes for Brunswick County Schools.

  • Students, staff embrace first day of school together

    As the rising of the sun Monday, Aug. 29, marked the beginning of a new week, it also marked the beginning of a new school year for students, parents, teachers and staff at Brunswick County Schools, including those at Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary, Shallotte Middle and West Brunswick High in the southern part of the county.

    One of the teachers rising to meet the sun and begin a new year as both a parent and teacher was fifth-grade history and social studies teacher Lindsay Creech at Jessie Mae Monroe  in Ash.

  • Self-driving cars may keep me sane

    The future we were promised may never get here so long as we don’t have our flying cars.

    Although, the one we got — with the pocket computer/TV/fantasy football draft organizer … I’m forgetting something, give me a sec … oh, and telephone — is pretty good.

    That is, unless your fantasy football draft went south. If so, my condolences.

  • Free speech isn’t free use of media outlets

    Twitter made headlines in July when it permanently banned a Breitbart editor for inciting a deliberate campaign of harassment against comedienne and actress Leslie Jones, one of the stars of the reboot of the movie “Ghostbusters” which featured women in the lead roles.

    Those who fight online bullying by racists and sexists applauded the decision while others decried it, saying Twitter violated Milo Yiannopoulos’ right to free speech.

  • Kudos to Sunset Beach for leadership

    Sunset Beach seems to have seen more than its fair share of turmoil in recent years.

    Yet despite being without a mayor and likely down one member of town council as of Aug. 31, the town is functioning on an even keel.

    Ron Watts resigned effective Aug. 16 as mayor after selling his house, while Lou De Vita tendered his resignation from council Aug. 8.

    Town council will vote on accepting De Vita’s resignation at the next board meeting Sept. 6 and will determine how to proceed with filling the remaining year in his term.

  • Carolina Shores dips into stormwater issues

    CAROLINA SHORES — Stormwater and flooding were foremost issues at a joint meeting of Carolina Shores commissioners and the town planning board.

    The day-long session Monday, Aug. 29, opened with a presentation by engineer Robert Tucker of East Coast Engineering outlining U.S. Department of Agriculture and Federal Emergency Management Agency maps and the town drainage system.

    He noted the town was built on a swampy area with soil that is generally poorly drained.

  • 27th Arts & Crafts Festival paints Oak Island

    The 27th Oak Island Art Guild Arts & Crafts Festival will once again colorize the Labor Day weekend landscape.

    The annual festival is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, in the soccer field behind Middleton Park at SE 46th Street and Dolphin Drive on Oak Island.

    More than 100 artists and vendors of handmade crafts as well as festival food will be featured.

    Admission is free, and there’s plenty of parking.

    Profits will go to support the Art Guild’s philanthropic activities.

  • Band of the Week: The Imitations wrap last of summer concerts in OI and HB

    They may be called The Imitations, but their musical talent is for real.

    Touting themselves as the “party band of the Carolinas,” Mike Merritt, George Hobbs, Richard Collier, Mike Miller and Tony Creech are celebrating 20 years together as the region’s genuine Imitations.

    Singing and dancing the best in classic beach, soul and rock’n’ roll, The Imitations are synonymous with good times.