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Today's News

  • Governor anticipates $2 billion shortfall in state budget; announces cuts

    RALEIGH—When N.C. Governor Bev Perdue was sworn in as governor Saturday, Jan. 10, she inherited an anticipated $2 billion budget shortfall for the current fiscal year.

    Perdue traveled to Washington, D.C., last week to meet with members of Congress and President Barack Obama’s transition team to urge the passing of a proposed stimulus package.

    Perdue encouraged the passing of a federal stimulus package “that will rapidly put North Carolinians back to work,” according to Perdue’s press office.

  • Commissioners OK 35-foot height for Calabash Town Center

    CALABASH—Town commissioners have approved a maximum 35-foot height for multi-family housing in the proposed Calabash Town Center development.

    A conditional-use permit was approved 3-2 last week by commissioners John Melahn, Cecelia Herman and Emily DiStasio, while commissioners Forrest King and Bill Dixon voted against it.

    Plans by Shallotte Partners call for 216 apartments or 18 three-story buildings on a 22.5-acre tract at the corner of Old Georgetown and Clariday roads. Commercial strips fronting both those roads will be developed separately.

  • Sheriff’s deputies make several larceny arrests

    A Supply man has been arrested after allegedly stealing more than $600 worth of cigarettes from a local convenience store.

    James Taylor Beaver, 21, of Supply, was charged with breaking and entering and larceny.

    Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office detective Tony Caison said Beaver stole 20 cartons of cigarettes from the Citgo on Holden Beach Road.

  • A dream fulfilled

    BOLIVIA—Wake up. This is not a dream.

    Carolynn Galloway Price uttered these words repeatedly, almost as if she were trying to remind herself as she spoke to a standing-room only crowd.

    “You can wake up, this is not a dream,” she repeated to the crowd at the county’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebration last week at the Brunswick County Commissioners chambers.

    The dream has been fulfilled, she said, and witnessed through the election of President Barack Obama.

  • Brunswick County delays and closings information

    Because of inclement weather, Sunset Beach Town Hall will open at 10 a.m. Wednesday instead of the usual 8:30 a.m., town receptionist Judy Presnell said Tuesday.

    For non-essential and non-public safety personnel, Brunswick County offices will close at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 20. County offices will re-open at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday.

    The Brunswick County Courthouse, which was closed Tuesday, will convene after a two-hour delay at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 21.

    Brunswick Community College cancelled all Tuesday, Jan. 20, classes.

  • Upset about bobcat kill

    To the editor:

    I was absolutely shocked to see the article you wrote about Mr. Faircloth and his shooting of a beautiful bobcat in Brunswick County. Somehow I thought we had become more educated and tolerant of the beauty of the wildlife we share the land with.

    Can it simply be ignorance that would cause someone to shoot a beautiful creature in its natural habitat for the sake of just shooting it? Can it be fair “sport” when a person armed with a rifle kills an innocent creature that has no chance against such things?

  • Looking for owners of photos

    To the editor:

    I bought a picture recently from Sheltered Treasures in Shallotte. In the frame was, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.”

    Behind this I found three pictures of a beautiful little girl with dark, curly hair. Now someone wants these back, I know.

    Please call 200-7721 to find out where to pick up these pictures.

    Sandy Benton

    Supply

  • Wants to set insurance deductible

    To the editor:

    Unlike most people, I am not going to present an argument against a 30 percent increase in my homeowner’s policy. My insurance friends have my permission to also add that increase to my auto and health.

    All I would ask of the insurance commissioner and my “like a good neighbor” friends is that in “all” these policies they raise one other thing while raising our rates. That one other thing would earn them a lot more money while costing us potentially more bucks. How about it? Deal or no deal?

  • Rates are based on risk factors

    To the editor:

    The recent comments about increases in insurance rates have prompted this letter.

    Insurance rates are based on risk factors primarily. If the chance you are going to have an accident is great, (see teenage drivers) your rate is higher because the chance of having to make a payment on your behalf is greater.

    The rate is not spread over the entire age spectrum—if you are younger, you pay more.

  • Lack of loss of life in recent plane mishap is truly one of life’s miracles

    If you’ve had the misfortune of sitting right beside me on a plane ride to anywhere, let me apologize. I’m one of those people who hate to fly, but I do it because I understand the value and time-savings the service provides.