.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • On and off the court, Yow was an ambassador

    The human race—not just women’s basketball—has lost one of its greatest ambassadors.

    Kay Yow, the longtime N.C. State women’s basketball coach, ended her splendid, earthly journey Saturday, 22 years after she was diagnosed with cancer.

    Kay didn’t just sip life, she gulped it. There was too much to savor while she was living on borrowed time. Some would say miraculous time.

  • Special dog for a special person

    Kermit is a 6-month-old special-needs Doberman mix who was born without the use of his hind legs due to severe hip dysplasia. When Kermit was 4 months old, he was brought to a veterinarian by his owner, who asked that he be euthanized. But the vet fell in love with Kermit and his endearing personality, treated and healed his sores and outfitted him with his very own wheeled cart to get around in. Now all he needs is a home. Volunteers with Adopt-An-Angel say Kermit would be great in a home with children or serving as a therapy dog with children who have physical disabilities.

  • UDO draws objections from Calabash business owners

    CALABASH—A standing-room-only crowd, consisting mostly of local business owners, turned out Tuesday night to register complaints about the town’s pending Unified Development Ordinance.

    The gist of their argument is the draft UDO imposes rules over the town’s core commercial district that don’t fit in with Calabash, such as banning roof signs, requiring uniform design and dictating colors buildings can be painted.

  • Officials allow gap in sandbag line to be filled

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—Officials from the Division of Coastal Management (DCM) have given the go-ahead for Ocean Isle Beach to write a permit for sandbags which will close a gap in a continuous line that runs from the quickly eroding east end to Charlotte Street.

    The gap, which is west of Shallotte Boulevard, was previously unable to be sandbagged because it did not meet a state rule that states sandbags have to be 20 feet from a structure.

  • Brunswick backs Dare County lawsuit

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County Commissioners have joined the fight against the N.C. Department of Insurance and its escalating homeowners’ insurance rates.

    At their Monday meeting, commissioners unanimously voted to contribute $10,000 to Dare County officials, who filed a lawsuit last month, claiming the N.C. Department of Insurance “violated constitutional provisions,” when approving rate increases of up to 30 percent in coastal North Carolina counties.

  • Officials: Schools’ food services not affected by peanut butter recall

    BOLIVIA—Students and parents can rest assured no products being served in Brunswick County Schools’ cafeterias are part of a nationwide recall of products resulting in an numerous illnesses caused by salmonella typhumurium, school officials say.

    Tina Ward, director of child nutrition services, said none of the food served has been involved in the recall, but oftentimes many recalls follow the initial recall. As a precaution, she has put a hold on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches that will last another week.

  • BCC avenges Region X loss, improves to 18-3

    Brunswick Community College avenged its only conference loss by beating Clinton Junior College 91-80 Sunday afternoon at West Brunswick High School.

    Jeremy Basnight hit four 3-pointers and scored 23 points. Jamar Taylor, with a scout from the University of Missouri in attendance, scored a career-high 21 points.

    “I told (Jamar) before the game (Clinton’s) No. 34 cannot be the best big man in the gym,” BCC coach Walter Shaw said. “And (Jamar) proved he was better.”

  • Although not associated with fresh fish, winter is a good time for tasty fish meals

    Winter is not usually associated with fresh fish, but among the few species available to local anglers are two that make terrific eating and fit perfectly in many good recipes. These are the speckled trout and the black drum, both of which can be caught throughout the year in all but the coldest weather. Specks are well known to seafood lovers as a culinary delight, while black drum lack the good reputation but are still a great fish to eat.

  • Long-awaited new clubhouse opens at Crow Creek

    There’s been a lot of bad news in the world of golf recently. In the last few years several courses up and down the Carolina coast have closed. Because of the down economy, total numbers of golf rounds have decreased, rentals are down and hotels are no longer filled. Restaurants are now closed for longer periods of time during the offseason.

  • U.S. 17 can be part of UDO process in Carolina Shores, consultant says

    CAROLINA SHORES—As the town updates its UDO, any changes it wants for U.S. 17 could be considered, a consultant said at a planning and zoning board workshop last week.

    Don Eggert of the Cape Fear Council of Governments said recommendations for the 2.7 miles of highway corridor under town domain could be part of the Unified Development Ordinance process.

    Among details under consideration are restricting the number of driveways per lot.