.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Coastal care van provides mammograms for uninsured women

    BOLIVIA—Every month, New Hanover Regional Medical Center’s Coastal Care Van cruises into five counties to provide mammograms for women, including the uninsured.

    Since 1998, the Coastal Care Van has been traveling through New Hanover, Brunswick, Pender, Onslow and Duplin counties to provide women with screening mammograms.

    The Coastal Care Van kicked off Breast Cancer Month on Oct. 1 by stopping at the Brunswick County Health Department to perform screening mammograms and talk about early detection.

  • Reader speaks out about education issues

    To the editor:

    I am a Christian who believes that the Bible is not only the word of God, but also it is God’s words. I also believe public school is the wrong place for teaching creationism. Parents and church are responsible for the spiritual teaching and guidance of the child.

    I sent my children to school to learn the three R’s—readin’, ’ritin’ and ’rithmetic. The spiritual teaching came from our church and within our home and the way we lived our daily lives for God.

  • No Child Left Behind not working

    To the editor:

    The federal government’s “No Child Left Behind” program has, in the opinion of this teacher, been a failure. The title sounds good, but the program has been implemented incorrectly and has resulted in all children being kept behind.

  • Beloved dog teaches owner value of forgiveness, forgetting, friendship

    Dogs can teach humans more things than we can ever teach them. Teaching your dog how to sit, lie down, roll over and shake does not even compare to the lessons they unknowingly teach us.

    One of the most important lessons dogs teach their owners—and quite possibly the most overlooked—is forgiveness. While everyone should practice forgiveness, it’s an act that does not always come easily.

  • Brunswick Town hosts Colonial Heritage Days

    Brunswick County Schools fourth graders took part in Brunswick Town’s annual Colonial Heritage Days last week.

    Costumed volunteers and employees portrayed people from Colonial times and showed students how they lived and worked.

    Brunswick Town has offered a Colonial Heritage Day for about 25 years, and has always been a free field trip for schools.

    “It’s a good exposure to what life was like in this county where they live 200 years ago,” Jim McKee, a costumed character who has worked Colonial Heritage Days for about 13 years, said.

  • West overcomes White Oak

    Jimmy Fletcher is glad his West Brunswick High School football team worked extra hard Friday night.

    The Trojans beat White Oak 13-7 in overtime.

    “We had talked before the game about playing for 48 minutes, 48 minutes, 48 minutes,” Fletcher said. “And tonight they played, what, 52 minutes.

    “I told them I’d rather just play 48.”

  • Former sheriff sentenced to 16 months

    First published at 3:23 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 2.

    Updated at 1:37 p.m. Monday, Oct. 6.

    Former Brunswick County Sheriff Ronald Hewett has been sentenced to 16 months in federal prison for his obstruction of justice charge.

    "I take full responsibility," Hewett said in U.S. District Court Monday afternoon.

    "I can't tell you how sorry I am—the remorse I feel. I want to thank the folks from Brunswick County standing behind me," Hewett said.

  • Missing person found

    Shallotte police helped locate a missing person from New Hanover County Thursday afternoon on White Street near Coastal Cinemas.

    Police found Robert Jutres, 39, and EMS transported him to a medical facility, according to a Shallotte Police Department spokesperson. Several police cars were parked along White Street around 3 p.m.

    No further information was available at press time.

    Check back with brunswickbeacon.com. for more details as they become available.

  • The queen is dead—let's hope

    Ever since the 1950s, when popular entertainment became big business, middle-class Americans, especially women, have had a particular affection for what’s now referred to as “the queen,” a gay man who denies his orientation, makes fun of himself and dresses in gaudy, outlandish outfits.

    It started with Liberace, the man all middle-class housewives loved to watch on television. He showed what every man could accomplish in post-war America, rising “above” his Midwestern roots to practically own Las Vegas.

  • History of Ocean Isle Beach: The Beginning Years (1946 to 1963)

    In 1947 and 1948, Odell Williamson began purchasing tracks of land that eventually comprised Ocean Isle Beach. These tracks of land were owned by various families, including the Brooks family, the Stanley family, the Gore family and the D. Stowe Crouse family.

    Williamson was originally in partnership with Mannon Gore, but Gore and Williamson soon parted ways, dissolving the partnership. Gore’s son, Ed Gore, soon focused on developing Sunset Beach while Williamson focused on Ocean Isle Beach.