Today's News

  • Sheriff's Office part of operation that busts large-scale drug ring

    The Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Drug Enforcement Unit ended a three month investigation last week with the arrest of five suspects in Loris, S.C.

    On March 25, drug agents from Brunswick County, South Carolina and the U.S. Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms executed a search warrant at a Loris, S.C., residence. Agents seized more than $180,000.00 in U.S. currency, a stock pile of weapons and more than 2 kilograms of cocaine.

  • Not quite sure what cut of beef to buy or how to prepare it?

    How many of you have gone to the grocery store or butcher shop and picked up a London broil to bring home to cook? Ever wonder what cut of beef is it? I doubt if you’ll find it on a beef chart that shows the various cuts of beef from a steer.

  • Edward Trexler

    Edward Wagner Trexler, 84, of Shallotte, died Tuesday, March 30, 2010 at his home surrounded by his family.

    He was born Jan. 2, 1926, in Detroit, a son of the late Egbert and Emma Wagner Trexler.

    He was a World War II veteran having served in the U.S. Navy.

    He retired as an electrician with IBEW Local Union No. 158 after 55 years of service.

  • 'Glorious Impossible Too'

    The Anointed Vessels Ministry, based in Ash, presented its first Easter season show in five years last week, “Glorious Impossible Too,” which told the story of Jesus’ life.

    The musical drama took place at the Can You Believe It Amphitheater in Ash, where the Rev. Diana Payne works every year to stage large-scale outdoor religious dramas for the public.

    The cast included people of all ages and brought the story of Jesus’ birth, ministry, death and resurrection to life and also connected it to the modern world.

  • Windy conditions affecting fishing for redfish

    Local fishermen have struggled through windy conditions for the last week, but the weather is supposed to change right on time for the hot redfish bite to resume this weekend. Anglers were in the midst of some strong red drum action in shallow water, but windy conditions have made it hard on them lately.

  • Richard Mandell: Designer in sync with today's issues

    One of the things I enjoy the most about writing this column is the chance to meet new people in the world of golf. Last fall I attended the Carolinas Golf Course Superintendent’s Association meeting in Myrtle Beach, S.C., and took the course “How To Do More With Less: Renovation and Construction,” taught by Richard Mandell, a well-known golf course architect with offices in Pinehurst.

  • Brunswick County Sheriff's Office crime report

    Brunswick County Sheriff’s deputies investigated the following incidents last week, which are taken directly from sheriff’s office incident reports:

    •Lost/stolen tags on Ocean Highway West in Calabash; tag fell off victim’s vehicle while driving.

    •Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle on Vereen Road in Ash; suspect took victim’s vehicle without permission.

    •Breaking and entering on Seashell Drive in Supply; suspect entered victim’s residence through the front door.

  • Shattered justice: Did the system fail Amy Frink?

    Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of stories about the life and death of Amy Caroline Frink, who, at just 18 years old, was brutally murdered in 1994, and her mother Birdie’s fight to bring justice to her youngest daughter almost 16 years later.

    Amy Frink was born premature—so small, her mother says, her father could carry her in one hand.

  • West girls’ soccer team wins in two more routs

     The West Brunswick girls’ soccer team headed into the spring break with two more impressive victories, beating West Bladen 8-2 March 31 and North Brunswick 6-1 April 1.

    The victories gave the Trojans a 3-1 record in the conference. Besides the scoring and the defense, what has impressed coach Laura Hickman has been the team’s focus against weaker opponents.

  • Terminal groin project could be started here

    In a close vote last week, the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission (CRC) voted 8-5 to recommend to the state General Assembly that the use of terminal groins could be feasible when used in conjunction with beach renourishment.

    That’s a step in the right direction for officials who have been pushing for terminal groins, like Ocean Isle Beach Mayor Debbie Smith.

    Now, the decision about whether terminal groins will become a possibility goes to the General Assembly.