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Today's News

  • On Campus with BCC: BCC gears up for reaffirmation of accreditation

    By Dr. Susanne Adams

    Guest Columnist

    Brunswick Community College has started preparing for its decennial review process by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools — Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

    BCC is set to be reaffirmed in 2019, but much work is already under way to get all the needed documentation ready and roll out the red carpet for the SACSCOC onsite visitors coming in fall 2018.

  • Sheriff’s officer’s actions justified in shooting involving Ash man

    Investigators determined an Ash man injured in a shooting at his home Tuesday morning was not shot by a Brunswick County sheriff’s officer.

    Bradley Barrett Lewis, 28, was taken to Grand Strand Medical Center in Myrtle Beach, S.C., after he suffered an apparent gunshot wound to his head, sheriff’s office spokeswoman Emily Flax said in a news release Tuesday afternoon.

  • Sunset Beach Police Department Feb. 28-March 2, 2017

    Sunset Beach police investigated the following incident and made the following arrest. All information is taken directly from incident and arrest reports.

    Feb. 28

    Larceny of a motor vehicle from Sea Trail later found burnt in South Carolina.

    March 2

    Jeffrey Cameron McLeod, 43, of Emerillon Court, Ocean Isle Beach, was arrested on charges of larceny and drunk and disruptive.

  • Calabash Fire Department February 2017

    During the month of February 2017, the Calabash Fire Department responded to 190 calls: eight structure fires, six fire alarms, 11 motor vehicle accidents, one rescue, one investigation, 29 public assistance calls and 134 EMS first-response calls.

  • Another orange alligator washes up

    Chalk up another orange alligator roaming the Carolinas. Gary “Zap” Ceponis recently snapped photos of yet another Cheetos-hued gator on the bank of a retention pond behind his house in Winding River Plantation.

    When he first shot photos on Feb. 23, Ceponis said it was a small alligator about two-and-a-half to three feet long. When he saw the gator again on March 1, Ceponis said the reptile appeared to be losing some of its orange color.

  • Clark graduates from basic

     Air Force Airman Harvey D. Clark Jr. graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland inTexas.

    Clark completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills.

    Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

  • Learning about listeriosis

     A couple of weeks ago, a friend posted on Facebook about a food recall. The “shocking” headline was about a popular refrigerator stable having deadly bacteria. Unlike many things you read on the Internet, this one was a true. The food recall was for packaged cheese and the bacteria are Listeria monocytogenes, frequently just called listeria. The food-borne illness you get from these bacteria is called listeriosis.

  • Some plants mask their green

     You would think that horticulture folks would be happy in March when everyone’s “wearin’ the green.” After all, green is our color — the color of chlorophyll found in plant leaves that allows the life-giving process of photosynthesis to happen. But, in this month of green beer and shamrocks, I started thinking about all of the great plants we grow that mask their green behind other pigments such as the red and burgundy Japanese maples, ‘”Summer Chocolate” mimosa and Cordyline ‘”Red Star” with its striking form.

  • U.S. pets get fatter, owners disagree with veterinarians on nutritional issues

     By Dr. Ernie Ward

     

    Our pets keep getting fatter. Pet obesity in the U.S. continued to steadily increase in 2016, affecting nearly 59 percent of cats and 54 percent of dogs, according to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP). During their ninth annual survey, APOP also found pet owners and veterinary professionals disagreed on key pet food issues such as the benefits of corn and grains, value of raw and organic diets, and the best sources of pet nutritional advice.

  • North Carolina encourages air quality forecast awareness

    The 2017 ozone season has started, as state and local environmental agencies renew their daily air quality forecasts for ozone in metropolitan areas across North Carolina.

    Ozone, which has been North Carolina’s most widespread air quality concern, continues to decline, thanks in large part to reductions in emissions from its primary air pollution sources: power plants, industry and motor vehicles.