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Today's News

  • Amid clutter of golf clubs and golf balls, one special golfer

    Walking through Douglas Williams’ garage is like walking through a golf museum.

    Dozens and dozens of golf bags full of clubs line one wall, and more bags and more golf clubs lie throughout the garage.

    Near another wall is a white bucket full of used golf balls, at least 100. A smaller bucket is full of more golf balls. Stacks of egg cartons also contain dozens of golf balls.

  • Dalton Gore qualifies for First Tee Open

    Dalton Gore, a rising junior at South Brunswick High School will fly on Aug. 23 to Monterey, Calif., to compete in the Wal-Mart First Tee Open, a Champions Tour event.

    Each First Tee participant is teamed with one Champions Tour player and two amateurs in a 54-hole tournament played at the Pebble Beach Golf Links and the Del Monte Golf Course.

  • Running down her dreams

    As baseball players tossed baseballs and infielders fielded groundballs one late afternoon at the West Brunswick High School baseball field, the conversation among the spectators was about the Trojans and their prospects in the upcoming Junior American Legion playoffs.

  • Wacky-pedia strikes again

    This time, it’s official. I’m no longer relying on the too-often-unreliable Wikipedia to obtain “facts.”

    I’ve always heard it, but this time I believe it: People with too much time on their hands and too little common sense write many of these entries.

    A funny dialect difference sparked my latest foray into pedia-madness.

  • Southerners love fried green tomatoes, and fried red tomatoes, too

    Fried green tomatoes are one of my favorite summer foods. If you haven’t tried them, you’re in for a treat.

    Native to Mexico and Central America, it’s not clear how tomatoes came to the United States. Thomas Jefferson grew them in the 1780s and credited one of his neighbors with the introduction, but Harriott Pinckney Horry recorded a recipe, “To Keep Tomatoes for Winter Use” in 1770.

  • Work of three artists featured at Franklin Square Gallery

    “I love taking a piece of clay and creating something that will remind people of the Southport/Oak Island area,” said local potter Lynn Stanzlaus.

    The Oak Island resident is one of three featured artists at the New Members Show this month at Franklin Square Gallery, joining watercolorists William James and Prentiss Halladay.

    The scenery of Southport and the surrounding beaches and marshes has inspired local and regional artists, especially the three under the spotlight this month.

  • Arts & Entertainment

    Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • There's plenty to keep busy: Garden honey-do's

    My mother always said idle hands were the devil’s workshop among other things I tried to ignore as a kid. If you are looking for ways to avoid becoming a conduit for Beelzebub, I have several garden honey-do’s that will pay off handsomely.

    Crape myrtles that have finished their first round of blooms can usually be coaxed into an encore performance with just a little work.

  • Tips for pruning summer flowers, and controlling pests

    Pruning

    For additional flowering, deadheading some of your favorite flowers now may force them to bloom again in the fall. Light pruning may be performed for most landscape plants except those you expect to have blooms from next spring such as azaleas. Storm damaged tissue may make it necessary to make heavier pruning cuts than normal to repair broken, leaning or dangerous limbs.

  • Plant now for second summer vegetable crop

    As a result of one of our reader’s comments, the following information is provided on planting a second summer vegetable crop:

    The thermometer may be stuck on 90 degrees, but don’t let the summer heat beat you out of a second crop of fresh summer veggies. There is still time for another crop across much of North Carolina, especially along the coastal area.