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Today's News

  • It's time to fire up the grill and start barbecuing!

    Nothing epitomizes summer cooking more than grilling; however, grilling can be very confusing. The more recipes, cookbooks and perspectives you encounter, the greater the diversity of opinion that arises.

    When do you apply the barbecue sauce? Gas or charcoal? Flip the food only once or frequently? High heat or low heat? Dry rubs or marinades? Cover closed or open? It can drive you nuts. Let’s check out the variables.

    BARBECUE SAUCE

  • Presentation warns students about dangers of drinking and driving

    “Every 15 minutes someone is killed in a motor vehicle accident.

    “Drinking and driving accidents claim more lives than those lost from all other drugs combined.”

    Statistics, such as these, echoed throughout the gym of Brunswick County Academy and Brunswick Early College High School on April 3.

    The staff and students of BCA/BCEC sat quietly throughout a program designed to show students what can happen if they drink and drive.

  • Arts & Entertainment

    Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Art gets folksy at House of Blues

    Outsider art will be celebrated this weekend as the Eighth Annual Summer Folk Art Festival kicks off at House of Blues in North Myrtle Beach, S.C.

    Regional and national artists will display their work around the venue for purchase.

    The festival will open at 9 a.m. and continue until 10 p.m. May 10 and 11. Admission is free.

  • The art of serving tea

    Sunset River Marketplace’s “Creative Exchange” series continues with “The Art of Serving Tea” by Kathy Cody and Anna Arlington, owners of the Calabash Garden Tea Room and Gift Shop. It will be from 11 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 14, at Sunset River Marketplace in Calabash.

  • Isn't grass supposed to be green?

    A fellow stopped by the office last week and asked a very pertinent question: “Isn’t grass supposed to be green?” He had a centipede lawn with lots of yellow spots and streaks that turned even more yellow when he added nitrogen.

    If this sounds like your lawn, you’re probably dealing with high pH soils and iron chlorosis. For most folks, talking about the vagaries of plant nutrition is about as exciting as watching the one stoplight change in the little town I grew up in, so I won’t bore you with all of the gory details.

  • Bees in the home? Who ya gonna call?

    Based on the number of calls coming into the office, carpenter bees appear to be gearing up for another season of aggravating homeowners. Carpenter bees resemble bumblebees, but they have abdomens that are entirely black and shiny. Bumblebees have yellow hairs on their abdomens.

    In the spring, carpenter bees drill holes about 3/8-inch in diameter into wood, most notably into decks, eaves and siding. Last year, many of the complaints we received indicated the bees seem to have a real liking for cedar and cypress siding.

  • Lawn Care Part II: Preparing your lawn for drought conditions

    Spring has started on a dry note along our coastline. Drought conditions are unpredictable and can be difficult to deal with in the landscape. Although droughts are usually thought of as long periods of time, such as months or years, our sandy soils can experience drought conditions after only a few days without rain. Even if we don’t have an outright drought this summer, preparing your lawn for dry weather is smart.

  • Pruitt birth

    Justin and Tiffany Pruitt are the parents of a daughter, Rowan Hadley Pruitt, born at 1 a.m. March 30 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    She weighed 7 pounds, 10 ounces and measured 20 inches long.

    She joins a brother, Eli, and a sister, Emma Claire, both 3.

    Maternal grandparents are Greg and Cheri Skaggs of Shallotte.

    Paternal grandparents are Dallas and Melodee Pruitt of Supply.

    Great-grandparents are Janice Skaggs of Richwood, W.Va., Bobby and Carolyn Lewis of Shallotte and Ruby Pruitt of Mount Airy.

  • Bruce birth

    Curtis and Ashley Bruce are the parents of a son, Curtis-Dean Eric Bruce, born at 12:41 p.m. March 28 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 7 pounds, 1 ounce, and measured 20 inches long.

    He joins sisters, Megan 6, and Hedan, 2.

    Maternal grandparents are Angela Beavers of Kings Mountain and John Eric Beavers of Charlotte.

    Paternal grandparents are the late Curtis D. Bruce Sr. and the late Carolyn A. Bruce.

    Great-grandparents are Cathy and Kenneth Ross of Bessemer City and Betty ad Jack Beavers of Kings Mountain.