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Today's News

  • Rotary Club second Chilled & Grilled Celebration set for Sept. 18 @ BCC

    Get ready to get chilled and grilled this Thursday night.

    That’s the name of the South Brunswick Islands Rotary Club’s second annual Chilled & Grilled Food and Wine Celebration set for 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at the Dinah E. Gore Fitness & Aquatics Center at Brunswick Community College.

    Come enjoy food and drink from more than 20 local restaurants, beverage distributors and wineries.

    Admission is $5 at the door.

  • Sunset Beach workshop Sept. 22

    Sunset Beach Town Council will have its monthly workshop at 1:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 22, at town hall.

    On the agenda are a report on beach rules and a Sunset at Sunset update.

    An agenda will be available on the town website, www.sunsetbeachnc.gov.

  • Sign-up requested for Calabash BIG Sweep

    BIG Sweep is sweeping and cleaning up Calabash on Saturday, Oct. 4.

    Volunteers interested in donating time to help clean up the community for two hours will gather at Calabash Community Park, 868 Persimmon Road, starting with registration and a welcome from 9:30 to 10 a.m.

    Litter pickup from 10 a.m. to noon will again include roadside and river cleanup, if anyone with a boat is interested. After helping out, BIG Sweep participants will be treated to lunch and prizes in the park from noon to 12:30 p.m.

  • Sunset Beach attorney resigns, takes new job with Ocean Isle Beach

    After more than 30 years providing legal guidance for the town of Sunset Beach, town attorney Michael Isenberg has resigned, only to take a new job with the neighboring town of Ocean Isle Beach.

    Isenberg said this week he did not resign from Sunset Beach in order to accept the new job with Ocean Isle Beach. He said he had already decided to resign.

    “As you know, there are a lot of hot-button issues” such as Jaguar’s Lair going on in Sunset Beach, Isenberg wrote in an email Tuesday, Sept. 16, to the Beacon.

  • A career first and having the last word

    Even though I’ve been in journalism for 20 years or so, I can still remember every first experience I’ve had in my career.

    I remember the first misspelling of my last name — Torak — and most of the rest, such as Turok (like the video game), Tork (like the Monkee), Took (like the past tense verb), Tonorock (like, well, I have no idea), Clark (like not even close) and — my favorite — Sock (like the article of clothing).

  • School board raise issue should stir outrage

    Service as an elected official requires a certain degree of sacrifice. Apparently, Brunswick County Board of Education members forgot that when they tried to give themselves a raise Aug. 28.

    It is difficult to believe, given their combined 57 years on the board, they did not know only the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners can give them a raise.

    It is astounding that they would try this in a year when teachers across the state had to fight so hard to secure an average 7 percent salary increase from the General Assembly.

  • Gone, but never forgotten: Brunswick County honors heroes

     SUPPLY — Never forget — That’s the message retired firefighters sent to a patriotic crowd at Brunswick Community College on the 13th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks that took the lives of nearly 3,000 American civilians, including 343 New York City firefighters.

    For the 11th consecutive year, a memorial service was held on the BCC campus by the Carolinas Retirees Association of the Fire Department of New York after a motorcade left South Carolina.

  • Charter school group asks county school system to settle lawsuit

     BOLIVIA — Charter Day School Inc. is asking Brunswick County Schools to remit more than $1 million it says has been withheld wrongfully.

    Brunswick County Schools officials, however, contend the nonprofit corporation that holds charters for two public schools in Brunswick County is owed far less.

    Local school districts are responsible for funding charter schools. By law, charter schools receive the per pupil allotment for each student they enroll. In Brunswick County, that allotment is about $7,600.

  • School board keeps novel in curriculum with restrictions

     BOLIVIA — A controversial novel will remain in Brunswick County Schools after the board of education voted to keep the book on library shelves with limitations.

    The board voted 4 to 1 to maintain the book in the curriculum for students 13 and older and ninth-grade English courses or higher. This includes 13-year-olds in eighth grade taking a ninth-grade honors level course.

    Middle school students who are 13 or older can check the book out of the school’s library as long as he or she has written consent from a parent or legal guardian.

  • Police ask for help locating alligator killer

     The Boiling Spring Lakes Police Department is asking for the public’s help locating the person who killed a 9-foot alligator last week.

    It’s unclear when the “intentional killing” near Big Lake on Alton Lennon Road took place, but authorities were told about the dead alligator Sept. 10, Boiling Spring Lakes Chief Brad Shirley wrote in a news release.