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Today's News

  • Shelter kitty seeks good home

    Ticker (ID No. A008445) is a black-and-white male domestic shorthair. He has been at the shelter since June 17. The shelter’s adoption fees for female cats and kittens is $55, which includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV (feline HIV) tests, rabies vaccination and spay surgery. Adoption fees for male cats and kittens are $35, which includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV test, rabies vaccination and neuter surgery. The shelter, at 429 Green Swamp Road (N.C. 211) in Supply, is open to the public for viewing animals and adoptions from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

  • Gray areas in law leaves room for much interpretation

    Lots of things are open to interpretation. Messages in the Bible, dreams, types of dancing, and yes, the law.

    And while my interpretation of the law may differ from the attorney representing the Brunswick County Board of Education, I expect an explanation of why my interpretation is inaccurate, if nothing else.

    The board’s meeting Thursday night, which lasted until the early hours Friday morning and contained two closed sessions, ended with no official action taken.

  • San Rio property owners prepare for lawsuit

    About 20 people who bought property at the now-defunct San Rio Ocean and River Club subdivision off Gray Bridge Road are preparing to file a lawsuit in Brunswick County Court.

    They hope to receive the money they invested in property that has not been developed and appears to have been abandoned.

    George Dedrick of Gibsonville said this week he and fellow San Rio property owner Kevin Brown began working with their banks to get their mortgages adjusted so they did not have to make balloon payments on a property without infrastructure that could not be developed.

  • Hung jury results in mistrial for West Virginia rape suspect

    A Brunswick County jury couldn’t come to a decision on whether to convict or acquit an 18-year-old West Virginia man accused of raping a girl in Brunswick County.

    The suspect is now free on bond, and another trial is not likely until next year, according to assistant district attorney Meredith Everhart, who prosecutes sex offenses and child abuse cases.

  • AirLink responds to beach rescue

    Brunswick County Emergency Medical Services and Tri-Beach Fire Department responded to a call about 12:12 p.m. Thursday of a man body surfing on Holden Beach who was driven into the sand by a wave, according to Brian Watts, director of Brunswick County EMS. The man complained of back and neck pain, and EMS decided to call the AirLink helicopter to take him to New Hanover Regional Medical Center ‘instead of taking a chance’ and transporting him via ambulance. The man’s name and condition have not been released.

  • Annexation bill passes House, moves to Senate

    The N.C. House of Representatives has approved the third reading of a bill that would allow property owners to force a referendum for pending involuntary annexations.

    The bill now goes to the Senate, but at least one representative says it’s going to be a hard fight there.

    House Bill 524 passed its third and final vote last Thursday and includes a provision for town residents or residents of the area to be annexed to petition for a referendum as well as a requirement for the town to provide services to the annexed area.

  • Distemper halts dog adoptions at Brunswick County shelter

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County Animal Services is continuing to suspend dog adoptions after more cases of distemper were confirmed earlier this month.

    Two weeks ago, two dogs at the shelter developed a respiratory illness. Laboratory results confirmed the cause of the illness to be distemper.

    Canine distemper is caused by a virus that is a highly contagious disease of wild and domestic carnivores.

  • Why is the moon a moon and not considered a planet?

    The moon has fascinated humanity since our creation. Since it is such a beautiful object in the sky, how could it not captivate one’s attention? We watch the moon as it waxes and wanes during the month as the sunlight travels across its face, illuminating its splendor.

    As a child, I remember the first time looking through a telescope to view the moon. I was amazed how much detail was visible in the eyepiece of my telescope. The moon was full and I could see mountains along the edge. It was not just a round orb but also a complex object full of features.

  • Garden enthusiast enjoys trying new plants in the botanical garden

    Just like the bottle of laundry detergent that screams “new” when the only thing new is the bottle, plant nerds like me love unfamiliar selections.

    One of the most enjoyable things I get to do is bring new plants to the area and see if they can live up to their billing. We brought back a group of plants from the J.C. Raulston Arboretum in Raleigh a couple of weeks ago and these will be added to the Brunswick Botanical Garden and the New Hanover County Arboretum as soon as they are large enough to withstand the rigors of growing in the garden.

  • More tips to help keep gardens healthy through the last months of summer

    Hot, dry weather favors powdery mildew. It is typically not fatal to woody ornamentals but can make them look bad. To control, spray every 7-14 days as soon as you notice the disease. Bayleton, Banner, Heritage and Daconil have activity against powdery mildew.

    Summer bug invasion