.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Despite her own pain, wife of nursing home patient fights for his recovery

     

    SUPPLY— Holding a laundry basket full of clothes, paperwork and other necessities under one arm, Beverly Galloway suddenly stops on her way out of her house.

    The door to her singlewide trailer has come off its hinges, and, as if by rote, she sets everything down and puts it back, making sure her home is secure before she leaves to visit her husband at Brunswick Cove Nursing Center in Leland.

    “This is what I go through every day,” she says.

  • Search for new Calabash administrator continues

    CALABASH—Town commissioners will continue sifting through resumes this week in their search for a new town administrator.

    The board met in closed session last Thursday to begin reviewing resumes received for the vacant position.

    By the end of the day on the Aug. 31 application deadline, the town received 130 resumes, interim town administrator Kelley Southward said Friday.

    At the conclusion of their two-hour closed session last week, commissioners had narrowed down the field of applicants to 19 candidates, Southward said.

  • Coast Guard considers setting public hearings on parasail deaths

    The U.S. Coast Guard officer investigating the recent parasailing incident that resulted in two deaths on Ocean Isle Beach is considering setting public hearings as part of the investigation.

    According to Lt. Gene Maestas of the U.S. Coast Guard, lead investigator Lt. Warren of the 5th Coast Guard District, Portsmouth, Va., is still collecting evidence and will make a determination on whether a public hearing is warranted.

  • Parents to choose if students can watch presidential address

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County students will have to wait until later in the week to view President Barack Obama’s educational message that aired live across the nation Tuesday.

    That is, if their parents say they can.

    Brunswick County Board of Education Chairwoman Shirley Babson said if more information about the president’s educational message to students were available to the public sooner, Brunswick County students would have likely been able to watch the address live Tuesday.

  • Resolution aims to eliminate stagnant water

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—In an attempt to eliminate stagnant water on the island, Ocean Isle Beach commissioners adopted a resolution Tuesday morning making each offense punishable by a hefty daily fine.

    Mayor Debbie Smith presented the resolution to commissioners at the town’s monthly meeting Tuesday morning, and said stagnant water that may collect in lots on foreclosed houses, on top of covered swimming pools and in other areas on the island is a nuisance and may also be a health hazard.

  • Corps responds to No Port's complaints, says recon study is "very preliminary"

    Last week, No Port Southport, a group opposed to the international container terminal planned by N.C. Ports Authority, sent out a newsletter condemning the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) for not scheduling public hearings during its reconnaissance study of a large-scale dredging project that would precede terminal construction.

    In the newsletter, No Port member Mike Rice informed other members of the decision and asked them to submit their opinions about the costs, benefits and environmental impacts of the project.

  • Shallotte planners OK rezoning, site plan

    The Shallotte Planning Board has approved a site and landscaping plan for a real estate office on Forest Drive. It also recommended rezoning property on Main Street owned by Longley Supply from residential to commercial and conservation.

    At its regular meeting Tuesday night, the board heard from property owner John Kinlaw, also a town alderman, who presented site and landscaping plan for conversion of a storage building he owns into a commercial real estate office on .38 acres on Forest Drive.

  • The transition between seasons: Late summer garden frustrations

    The transition between seasons always frustrates my gardening efforts. Those zinnias that produced such wonderful cut flowers earlier are covered in powdery mildew and leaf spot. The lantana has swallowed the coneflower and the Walter’s viburnum. The Goldsturm rudbeckia is reduced to brown seed heads with a stray golden flower. Most of the petunias melted in the August heat.

    So what can we do to get through this summer-into-fall transition time?

  • Keeping up with gardening trends: They are always evolving

    Trends in gardening are always evolving. The national economy sometimes dictates our activities and that is the case with our landscapes. People often turn to the outdoors for a way to enjoy life more and to help out with their own finances at home.

  • Fall is almost here; soon the state will be bursting with color

    We are approaching one of the most beautiful times of the year, the seasonal changes that occur between the coastal plain, piedmont and the mountains provide us with an extended viewing of the colors of leaves as winter approaches.

    A trip through North Carolina in the next few weeks will dazzle your eyes. After viewing the magnificence of the mountains in full color, you can almost wear your eyes out.