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Today's News

  • County considers options for old Brunswick Community Hospital facility

    SUPPLY—Brunswick County officials are considering their options for what was once Brunswick Community Hospital in Supply.

    When Novant Health opened Brunswick Novant Medical Center in July, Brunswick Community Hospital closed its doors.

    Then, in September, the former hospital on U.S. 17 in Supply reverted back to county ownership.

    Brunswick County commissioners, however, made it clear they did not want an aging and expensive hospital facility on their balance sheet, and Brunswick County Manager Marty Lawing opened the hospital up for bid.

  • District court docket

    The following cases were adjudicated over four days of District Criminal Court on Oct. 31 and Nov. 1, 2, 3, 7 and 8 in Bolivia.
    Codes: PG, pleaded guilty; PNG/NG, pleaded not guilty, found not guilty; PNG/G, pleaded not guilty, found guilty; BCDC, Brunswick County Detention Center; NCDOC, North Carolina Department of Corrections.

  • Education briefs

    BEMC awards classroom grants
    Throughout the month of November, North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives, including BEMC, will award Bright Ideas education grants to deserving teachers across the state. The grants make possible innovative, classroom-based projects that would otherwise go unfunded.
    This year, BEMC will contribute $44,043.97 to teachers in Brunswick and Columbus counties. In total, North Carolina’s Touchstone Energy cooperatives will collectively contribute nearly $600,000 to fund more than 550 Bright Ideas projects this year.

  • Religion briefs

    Coat closet
    seeks donations
    The St. James the Fisherman Episcopal Church Neighbor to Neighbor Coat Closet outreach program is open from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Donations of warm, gently used adult and children’s coats will be accepted on these days. Vouchers will be needed to receive a coat. Call the church office at 754-9313.
    Thanksgiving service set

  • Changing one’s mind is crucial to growth

    Often, unfortunately too often, individuals who change their mind are perceived as shallow, superficial and unable to stick to their guns. Knowing smiles accompany the perception of ambivalence as viewers see weakness rather than strength. Disappointment reigns, vocalized both orally and non-verbally in the chastisement: “Make up your mind!”

  • Parker-Garner

    Katie Mae Parker and Brandon Guy Garner, both of Supply, were married Oct. 15 at Camp United Methodist Church in Shallotte. The Rev. Richard Vaughn officiated the ceremony.
    The bride is the daughter of Al and Ramona Parker of Supply. The groom is the son of Terry and Marilyn Garner of Laurinburg.
    The bride was given in marriage by her parents.
    She wore an ivory silk taffeta strapless dress with pleating details and a pleated corsage of flowers in the back, a floor length ivory veil and carried an ivory bouquet of mixed flowers.

  • Marshall-Phelps

  • Only the turkey should be stuffed

    Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension
    Brunswick County Center
    Many people gain one to five pounds each year between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. That may not seem too bad, but the long-term problem is most people who gain weight during the holidays never manage to return to their pre-holiday weight in the new year. Year after year, this adds up.

  • Master Gardeners complete Ocean Trail community project

    In February, a group of interested gardeners enrolled in the Brunswick County Master Gardener class, which required a community project upon completion of the course. This year, 19 Master Gardener interns donated time to upgrade the secret garden at the Ocean Trail Health Care and Rehabilitation Center in Southport.
    Melanie Long and her staff take pride in offering opportunities to enhance the quality of life for residents. After the secret garden project drew to an end, the Master Gardeners still had money left from all the generous donations throughout the county.

  • Take action on pond maintenance this fall

    Water gardens are becoming a popular addition to any landscape. They require maintenance throughout the year. Preparation for the winter months is especially important for the survival of aquatic plants and the wildlife in and around the pond. Debris such as leaves and dying plants must be removed, especially if there are fish in the pond.