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Today's News

  • Judge halts Warren’s removal hearing

    A court order has halted a hearing to remove county commissioner Charles Warren from his post on the county’s social services board.

    Superior Court Judge Jay Hockenberry on Thursday granted Warren a temporary restraining order, which protects him from removal proceedings scheduled for Tuesday.

    The hearing, originally scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17, was to determine if there was just cause to remove Warren from the county’s social services board.

  • New lineup inspires West’s girls to victory over South

     BOILING SPRING LAKES—A new starting lineup helped inspire West Brunswick beat South Brunswick 48-35 in a conference girls’ basketball game Jan. 10.

  • Buffkin, Jacobs lead West Brunswick to victory over South

     BOILING SPRING LAKES—The combination of Taylor Buffkin’s 24 points and Jamal Jacobs’ 13 points was too much West Brunswick offense for South Brunswick to overcome and make a run at victory on its home court Jan. 12.

    West beat the Cougars 59-42 in the conference basketball game. The game was West’s seventh straight on the road, and it is 4-3 in that stretch. West (3-3, 8-7) ends the road trip on Jan. 20 at Whiteville.

  • Wrestling video: Marquis Brown vs. Julian Birch
  • District court docket

    The following cases were adjudicated over three days of District Criminal Court on Dec. 28, 29 and Jan. 3 in Bolivia.

    Codes: PG, pleaded guilty; PNG/NG, pleaded not guilty, found not guilty; PNG/G, pleaded not guilty, found guilty; BCDC, Brunswick County Detention Center; NCDOC, North Carolina Department of Corrections.

    Wednesday, Dec. 28

    Judge jerry A. Jolly presided over the following cases with prosecutor Ally Yeager and courtroom clerk Jennifer Hearn:

    Edar Eliud Espinosa, PG no operator’s license, prayer for judgment continued.

  • Ocean Ridge makes community donations

    Brunswick County’s newest community foundation, the Ocean Ridge Charities Association (ORCA), announced its first-ever grants to several local charities in late November. The awards totaled $2,500 and were divided among six county nonprofits: New Hope Clinic, Providence Home; Wave4Kids, Boys & Girls Homes of N.C., First in Families and the Brunswick County Literacy Council.

  • Does life give us meaning or do we give meaning to life?

    “Life does not give us meaning. Life has only the meaning we give it,” from Happiness by Joan Chittister (Eerdmans). That statement stopped me in my tracks.
    I put down the paper I was reading and began to think about those words, to view them while considering my own life. The new year is in its early stages. I still have time to review and renew my understanding of life and the meaning I give it. I still have the opportunity to discern who I might be and become this year and what I might do differently, as a result.

  • Classes discuss living with osteoporosis

    By Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension Service
    Brunswick County Center
    During the past year, Diana Jones, RN, from the Brunswick County Health Department, and I have taught classes about osteoporosis throughout Brunswick County. We’ve conducted classes at several of the libraries and at the Government Center in Bolivia.

  • New Year resolutions every gardener should make

    Well, we made it through another year and survived one heck of a hot summer. In the months of January and February, the weather is cooler and there is less work to be done in the garden. It is a great time to plan for the upcoming spring.
    As gardeners, there are steps that we can take to improve the environment and ecosystems that surround us. Consider adopting one or more of these resolutions for your garden in the New Year:

  • Some tips for caring for storm-damaged trees

    By Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    Luckily, our recent winter storm did not dump enough snow or ice in our area to cause major damage to trees and shrubs, but this is not always the case.
    Winter storms do strike southeastern North Carolina every so often and can cause major damage to trees and shrubs. Even more common is damage caused by tropical systems or intense thunderstorms.