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Today's News

  • It’s OK to be a mom who doesn’t always get things right

    There are those mothers who can’t stand to be ordinary. They were probably overachievers in school, and now they have to be overachievers in motherhood.

    Everyone knows at least one or two of these moms. They’re the ones who can’t throw normal birthday parties with cake and ice cream. These moms have to have themes and make their own invitations, party hats and tablecloths.

    These same moms show up for class parties with homemade, child-sized, three-course mini-meals. Of course, these moms are always perfectly coiffed and dressed to the nines.

  • Congratulations to World Series teams

    Brunswick County athletes have proven they have a lot of heart.

    Recently, the Brunswick County Debs earned a chance to play in the Dixie Debs Softball World Series. They finished their World Series championship bid in the top six, ending the series 2-2.

    This is the second straight year the Debs have earned a spot in the World Series; they finished fifth. Last year, they were 0-2 in the series.

  • District Court Docket

    The following cases were adjudicated over five days of District Criminal Court on July 22, 23, 24, 27 and 28 in Bolivia.

    Wednesday, July 22

    Marion R. Warren presided over the following cases with prosecutor Cathi Radford and courtroom clerk and Lisa Quick:

    Charles R. Abercrombie, unsafe movement, voluntarily dismissed.

    Arlethea Marie Adams, speeding 66 in a 55 zone, costs.

    James Marvin Adomat, fail to wear seat belt/driver, paid; no operator’s license, drive/allow motor vehicle no registration, both voluntarily dismissed.

  • West Midnight Madness Friday

    The West Brunswick High School football team will have its first night of full-contact scrimmaging at midnight Friday at West.

    “We invite the public to come out,” athletics director John Floyd said.

    Trojan fans who want to purchase season tickets to West Brunswick High School games may call Floyd at 398-2740 to reserve them.

    “You call me and I am going put your name on a list,” Floyd said. “When you come to the first (home) game (Sept. 4), your tickets will be at the gate. You can pay at the gate.”

  • Department of Justice visits Board of Education on minority concerns

    A representative from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) spent several hours Friday at Brunswick County Schools, after receiving complaints about minority treatment within the district.

    Board chairwoman Shirley Babson said Walter Atkinson, from the DOJ, spent about two hours Friday explaining concerns he received from the Brunswick County community.

  • Unemployment rate increases slightly; state program aims to retrain workers

    Brunswick County’s unemployment rate grew slightly in June, up from 10.8 to 11 percent. Officials are hoping that will change when local job seekers apply for a state program that pays tuition and fees to retrain them for new careers.

    Brunswick County’s Employment Security Commission (ESC) Director, Eli Smith, said recently that, in June, more high school and college students began seeking employment, adding to the number of jobseekers that outnumber the available jobs.

    “The availability has not kept pace with the number of people,” Smith said.

  • The economy will be the legacy of the Obama administration

    When it is all said and done, President Obama’s legacy will not be defined by the success or failure of implementing a sound healthcare program. The economy will be his Waterloo or Normandy.

    Reasonable housing, energy and food costs, stable employment and a comfortable retirement income are the major concerns of most Americans.

  • Turf troubles: It's difficult to grow turf grass in North Carolina

    If you haven’t already figured it out, southeastern North Carolina is one of the worst places in the world to grow turf grasses. We sometimes have winter temperatures that cause injury to warm-season grasses like centipede and St. Augustine. It’s just too blasted hot in the summer for even the most heat-tolerant, cool-season grasses like tall fescue to survive. Throw in weeds, ground pearls, high pH, large patch, dollar spot, chinch bugs and all of the other issues and you have tough turf growing conditions.

  • Getting past the summer doldrums and knowing what your plants need

    Heat indexes are high and causing plants to flop from the hot dry “oven-like air.” Be sure to check your watering needs for your plants especially any new plantings. Here are some other timely tips for this time of year:

    Pruning

    For additional flowering, deadheading some of your favorite flowers now may force them to bloom again in the fall.

  • Tips for keeping your garden green and chemical-free

    I am not talking about lawn here; I am talking about keeping our gardens free of unnecessary chemicals, saving energy and capturing and storing carbon. Extra water consumption, fertilizers and pesticides routinely used to coddle gardens account for large amounts of energy use along with carbon emissions. There are many simple and fairly easy steps we can all take to save energy and capture and store carbon in our gardens. The cool part of this endeavor is that we will also be lowering our energy bills as well as our physical labor.