.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Attorney’s advice is step in right direction

    Calabash town attorney Mark Lewis sent a letter to commissioners last week advising them to release information about a possible property purchase—information that has been withheld from the public since the board met on March 8.

  • 'Honoring Life': Lifelong painter brushing up for first art show Saturday in Calabash

    He’s a lifelong artist, cook and, up until a few years ago, chemist.

    Jakobus ‘Co’ Bungener has stirred up a little bit of everything in his multi-faceted life.

    But there’s one thing the 76-year-old resident of Shallotte Assisted Living has never done. He’s never had his own art show.

  • Zacek, Walsh pitch North to victory over the Cougars

     BOILING SPRING LAKES—David Zacek gave up one hit through five innings and reliever Tim Walsh ended the game with two strikeouts with the tying runs on base as North Brunswick beat South Brunswick 6-4 March 29 in a conference baseball game.

    Both pitchers were sharp in the early innings. In the top of the third, North’s James White led off with a walk against starter Mark Price. With one out, White stole second. He scored on a single to right field by Tim Walsh.

  • Too good to be true

    Don’t let a thief steal your identity or scam you out of money.

    During the Brunswick County Community Watch’s March meeting on Monday, Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Sgt. Bert Reaves with the crime prevention unit spoke about ways to prevent identity theft and scams as well as the importance of serial numbers.

  • Do you have money waiting for you?

    Do you have money that you don’t know about?

    It could be like winning the lottery, only without purchasing a lottery ticket.

    The state of North Carolina Department of the State Treasurer is holding nearly $400 million in unclaimed money. Some of it could be yours.

    As of March 29, 2011, there were 1,746,697 unclaimed properties in the state. A full listing of unclaimed properties is available online at www.nctreasurer.com.

  • New traffic pattern in Shallotte

    SHALLOTTTE—The Smith Avenue extension project, now at least three months past its projected completion date of December 2010, is reportedly 72 percent complete, according to a progress report published on the N.C. Department of Transportation’s (NCDOT) website.

    This weekend a new traffic pattern emerged in Shallotte.

  • Mandatory direct deposit could save enough for one teacher position

    BOVLIA—If Brunswick County Commissioners adopt a less than revenue-neutral tax rate, Brunswick County Schools could receive less county funds than expected.

    According to figures provided by Brunswick County school officials, an estimated $1.5 million less in county dollars brings the school system’s estimated shortfall to about $7 million for the 2011-2012 fiscal year. 

  • Technology increasing too quickly for school infrastructure

    BOLIVIA—As more technology becomes available to Brunswick County Schools, the closer the school system is to reaching its power limit.

    During the Brunswick County Board of Education operations committee meeting Tuesday, Leonard Jenkins, technology director, said 75 to 80 percent of classrooms are equipped with 21st Century technology equipment—laptops, document cameras, LCD projectors and interactive writing tablets.

  • Funding for multimedia equipment steers school system away from TVs

    BOLIVA—The Brunswick County school system is moving away from the use of TVs in the classrooms.

    Instead, computers will soon be able to function as TVs, eliminating the need for any future TV purchases.

  • Staggered school start times could save system $500,000

    The bells may ring at different times next year at Brunswick County schools.

    In an effort to reduce a $6 million budget deficit, Superintendent Edward Pruden has proposed staggered start times for elementary, middle and high schools.

    “We’re having to take a look at everything very carefully, and we’re trying to identify ways that we could save substantial amounts of money without impacting the classroom,” Pruden said Monday afternoon.