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Today's News

  • Interrupting these programs for a Lenten intervention

    Laura Lewis

    The cartoon in my New Yorker desk diary this week is supposed to be funny, as are most New Yorker cartoons.

    “I’m giving up Google for Lent,” a woman announces to her husband as he’s cruising the computer in the depiction.

    Actually, it is funny. But it also correlates with what I’m seriously trying to do this week by giving up television.

  • No billboards on U.S. 17, Carolina Shores P&Z says

    CAROLINA SHORES—As members adopted a U.S. 17 corridor plan this week, the town planning and zoning board also has agreed to ban billboards and regulate other signage.

    Members informally agreed at a Feb. 18 workshop they do not want billboards along the almost 3-mile stretch of highway corridor over which the town has domain.

    As assistant town administrator Amanda Chestnut works on updating town ordinances, it also was agreed the town doesn’t want signs too close to the roadway or in the right-of-way.

  • Calabash business owners urge leniency in town rules

    CALABASH—Local merchants don’t want new rules that are going to place restrictions on their traditional way of doing business.

    The latest round of comments came last week at the first meeting of a Unified Development Ordinance committee appointed by Calabash Mayor Anthony Clemmons, who headed the Feb. 19 meeting.

    “Everybody is fine with Calabash the way it is,” said Dean Spatholt of Callahan’s of Calabash, speaking amid a roomful of local business and property owners.

  • Calabash commissioners no-shows at special meetings

    CALABASH—The mayor and two commissioners refused to take part in a specially called meeting to go into closed session last week, then were no-shows when the session was recessed until Tuesday.

    Calabash Mayor Anthony Clemmons, Mayor Pro Tem Forrest King and town commissioner Bill Dixon balked at the meeting called Feb. 20 because the town attorney wasn’t present.

    When town attorney Mark Lewis showed up for the second meeting Tuesday afternoon, a closed session could not be called because Clemmons, King and Dixon did not show up.

  • Calabash Elks celebrate 25th anniversary

    CALABASH—When comes to Calabash Elks Lodge No. 2679, a lot has happened in a quarter-century.

    Birthed in February 1984 in a local barbershop and reared in the seafood capital of the world, the lodge has blossomed from nearly losing its charter to the largest in the east district with more than 1,100 members.

    It’s a rich history commemorated in the lodge’s many books at its now flourishing headquarters on Carter Drive.

    This week, lodge members are celebrating that history with a party honoring original charter members this Friday, Feb. 27.

  • 2008 Sunshine Week coverage
  • Dream Seekers project teaches students about ecosystems, environment

    Students at Virginia Williamson have spent the past two months studying ecosystems found within Brunswick County.

    Jennifer Fuller, an environmental educator, was brought in to coordinate the CIS Dream Seekers project, which was made possible by a grant from the Brunswick County Arts Council and the N.C. Arts Council.

    Through the project, students got an up-close look at snakes, turtles and other animals brought in by the Bald Head Island Conservancy, and The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission brought in animal skulls and skins for students to examine.

  • Wilma 'n' Fred

    Wilma, right, is a 1-year-old brown tabby with beautiful orange eyes who has been at Cat Tails for quite a while awaiting a new home. She has a brother named Fred. Wilma is playful, loves attention and gets along well with other cats and people except she would not do well in a home with small children. To see her and her brother, call Cat Tails at 253-1375 or visit its Web site at www.cattails.org. You can visit Wilma and Fred, as well as all the other cats and kittens available for adoption, at Cat Tails in the Corner Stone center at 6622 Beach Drive in Ocean Isle Beach.

  • Coupons intended to save money burn a bigger hole in pocket

    Everyone in my family has always loved a bargain.

    My dad’s greatest joy is returning from the supermarket and announcing his greatest deal of the day. More often than not, it’s a couple of dollars saved on a gallon of milk.

    “And I didn’t even need a coupon!” he’ll say every time.

    My cousin Debbie is always swindling freebies from people, but the good part about it is she’s always willing to share. You can’t leave her house without a bag full of gourmet coffee samples or vending machine snacks.

  • North Carolina stimulus funding: more questions than answers

    RALEIGH—North Carolina is slated to receive a $6.1 billion share of the recently approved $787 billion included in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

    But exactly how and when the money will be spent has yet to be determined.

    “We do not have all of the requirements set out by federal agencies,” Chrissy Pearson, Gov. Bev Perdue’s press secretary, explained.