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Today's News

  • Operation April Fools drug roundup suspect list

    The following suspects were charged in connection with last week’s countywide drug roundup, Operation April Fools.

    All information was provided from the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office. The suspects and their charges are:

    •Dennis Knight, 57; charged with possession with intent to manufacture, sell and deliver a schedule II controlled substance.

    •Pam Johnson, 32; charged with possession with intent to manufacture, sell and deliver cocaine.

  • A government bailout of the newspaper industry is the last thing it needs

    Everywhere I go the question is always the same: What is the future of newspapers?

    I try my best to forecast where the newspaper industry is headed—opining about how I think community newspapers will outlive dailies, preaching newspapers must befriend not begrudge the Internet and reminding people there will always be the need for quality, objective news.

    But the answer is simple—the newspaper industry is headed where the market takes it.

  • Video included: Early-morning drug roundup nets 47 arrests, 99 charges

    BOLIVIA—The swift, early morning drug attack was launched before last Wednesday’s sun rose.

    By lunchtime, Wednesday, April 1, 45 drug suspects were booked, processed and in custody at the Brunswick County Detention Center as part of the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office countywide drug roundup. At press time Tuesday, 47 drug suspects were arrested, facing a total of 99 charges, Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Lt. Marty Folding said.

  • Marine Patrol seizes illegal grouper catch

    Marine Patrol officers seized 12 illegally caught grouper Friday night, after staking out a Brunswick County fish house, waiting for the commercial fishing vessel Capt. Star.

    Marine Patrol Officers Jonathan Weaver and Jonathan Hall charged the boat’s captain, Milton Muellerweiss, 50, of Ocean Isle Beach, with engaging in a commercial fishing operation without being properly licensed and with exceeding the harvest limit for black and gag grouper.

  • Elderly woman wants others to be aware of possible phone scam

    When 80-year-old Emily Clark got a call from someone alleging to be her grandson last week, she knew fairly quickly something wasn’t quite right.

    The caller said he was in jail in Canada and needed help. Money would be required to bond him out of the pen after he was allegedly involved in a wreck. The caller pleaded with Clark to not call his parents because they told him not to go to Canada. He didn’t want them to know he was there, so instead he called his “grandmother” for help.

  • Local officials, activists endorse competing annexation reform laws

    Competing bills in the state House and Senate address the controversial issue of involuntary annexation, something that has been debated locally for several years.

    The N.C. League of Municipalities recently announced support of bills in the House and Senate that would require towns to provide citizens with at least two of four major services before annexing, and other requirements while retaining towns’ rights to annex if needed.

  • Seeking stimulus money: County looks to cash in on stimulus grants, loans

    BOLIVIA—With two county water projects already in the pipeline to receive stimulus money, county commissioners have approved submitting three more projects to tap into additional stimulus funding.

    Commissioners previously approved submitting two shovel-ready water projects to the Public Water Supply Section of the N.C. Department of Environmental and Natural Resources, which provides loans and grants for local governments for water projects.

    On Monday, commissioners OKed submitting three more projects for stimulus money.

  • Cutbacks foreseen in Calabash's next budget year

    CALABASH—“Lean year,” “bootstraps,” “economize” and “shortfall” were among terms bandied about by town commissioners at an April 2 workshop to discuss the proposed 2009-2010 budget.

    “Last year was a lean year, and I think we’re going to have another lean year,” said mayor pro tem Forrest King, who serves as finance officer for the town board, advising they’re going to have to “pull bootstraps and cut out some of the ridin’.”

  • Carolina Shores mayor: I won't step down

    CAROLINA SHORES—Mayor Stephen Selby recently told a number of people he intended to step down in the wake of “discord and disharmony” at town hall.

    “This was my intention up until a few days ago,” Selby said, reading from a prepared statement at the monthly Carolina Shores commissioners meeting Tuesday. “However, I was elected by the people to change the past reputation of this town into one that would encourage folks to move here and enjoy the great place we have here in Carolina Shores.”

  • Sheriff's office to host weekly senior citizens' academy

    The Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office is gearing up for its newest community-based initiative, a senior citizens’ academy.

    Crime prevention officer Sgt. Todd Coring said the eight-week senior citizens’ academy, which will be 9-11 a.m. every Tuesday at Shallotte Town Hall, is slated to kick off Tuesday, April 14. The 16-hour course is free and open to the public, and there is no application process, Coring said.