.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Petches celebrate 50 years

    Family and friends celebrated the 50th wedding anniversary of longtime Brunswick County residents, Richard and Lynn Petch, at their home in Ash on Saturday, May 23. The couple met in high school in Durham and attended Duke University together. They were married May 25, 1959, in Loris, S.C. They owned and operated Farwinds Stables in Calabash for about 35 years. Through Farwinds, the Petches offered horsemanship and riding lessons, summer camps for children, farriers services and care for horses as well as operating a hay farm on the premises.

  • Maier-Gordon

    Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Amber Maier and Joshua Gordon. The bride-elect is the daughter of Kimberly and Horace Ponds Jr. of Shallotte. The prospective groom is the son of Angela and Ronald Gordon of Shallotte. A Sept. 26 wedding is planned at Sharon United Methodist Church on Holden Beach Road.

  • Russ

    Daniel and Laura Russ of Ocean Isle Beach are the parents of a daughter, Haylea Grace Russ, born at 6:08 a.m. July 5 at New Hanover Regional Medical Center.

    She weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces and measured 21 inches long.

    She joins a brother, Joshua, 6.

    Maternal grandparents are Ed and Betty Parbst of Supply. Paternal grandparents are James and Connie Russ of Ocean Isle Beach.

    Great-grandparent is E.V. Gore of Ocean Isle Beach.

  • Sharing life experiences, enjoying 'The Boy in Striped Pajamas'

    I am so excited! Our granddaughter is coming to visit, a solo act for two weeks, until her family arrives later in the month.

    This is a first for all of us, so it comes with eagerness, enthusiasm, and a degree of trepidation.

    Papa Jean-O wonders what we will do to entertain a 15-year-old. I caution this is not a vacation but time spent with grandparents whose geographic distance causes them to miss all the events and growth steps.

  • Remains positively identified as Alice Donovan's

    Remains recovered in January off a rural road in Horry County, S.C., have been positively identified as those of a woman who was abducted and brought to Brunswick County in November 2002 by two Kentucky prison escapees.

    The remains—bone fragments and a human skull—have been positively identified as those of Alice Donovan of Galivants Ferry, S.C., Horry County Police Sgt. Robert Kegler said Tuesday.

    Those findings were released last Friday following DNA testing at the University of North Texas, Kegler said.

  • For Lady Dolphins' new coach, basketball is a family tradition

    Having completed the dribbling drills at the recent Brunswick Community College basketball camp, the small group of players gathered for a huddle before moving on to the next drill. They gave a weak-hearted, low-spirited cheer and then dispersed.

    The coach of those drills called them back. She was dissatisfied with their attitude. So they huddled again. The cheer was louder, but robotic. They tried to disperse again, but the coach made them huddle again. This time, the cheer was enthusiastic, and they moved on to the next drill.

  • Hope Mills rallies, beats Brunswick County for Junior Dixie state title

    SOUTHPORT—The hopes of the Brunswick 13-year-olds Junior Dixie Boys baseball team going to the World Series ended July 23 at Smithville Park as Hope Mills rallied from a 5-0 deficit for an 11-6 victory.

    The victory advanced Hope Mills, a suburb of Fayetteville, to the World Series.

    Brunswick pitcher Jacob Shumate had an easy first inning, as he retired the first three batters in order.

  • Terminal groin bill stalled in committee

    Ocean Isle Beach—Senate Bill 832 is stalled in the N.C. House committee, and Debbie Smith, Ocean Isle Beach mayor, went to Raleigh earlier this month to find out why.

    Smith, along with several other local mayors and area representatives, met with Joe Hackney, speaker of the house, hoping to find out why Senate Bill 832, which would make terminal groins legal in North Carolina, has been stalled in the committee on environment and natural resources since May.

  • Getting access to public information is sometimes harder than it should be

    Getting the news out to the public can be a mix of fun and excitement. Sometimes it’s hard; sometimes it’s emotional.

    And sometimes, it can be down right intimidating.

    As a reporter in Kentucky, I was eager to join up with law enforcement one day after receiving a call about an indoor marijuana-growing operation in my hometown. The officers invited me along and told me I was welcome to take pictures of the enterprise, the likes of which hadn’t been seen in the area before.

    I showed up with two cameras in tow, a notebook and several pens.

  • Woman bitten by shark at Holden Beach

    A woman was bitten by a shark while in the water at Holden Beach on July 22, according to Holden Beach Police.

    Police said a shark bit a 26-year-old woman around 3 p.m. Wednesday, July 22. Witnesses said Julia Anne Mittelberg of Morton, Ill., was in about 3-4 feet of water in the 400 block of Ocean Boulevard West. She reportedly felt something on her left foot in the water. After making her way to shore, she discovered a bite wound on her left foot.