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Today's News

  • No Port’s dredging study: Costs outweigh benefits

    No Port Southport analyzes every aspect of the creation of the new container terminal planned for 600 undeveloped acres near Southport.

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has received $96,000 in federal funding to study the feasibility of dredging a new channel from the terminal site to the east of the existing 42-foot channel, but one No Port member has completed his own study to determine the cost-benefit ratio of the dredging project.

  • Carolina Shores P&Z says no to bond release

    CAROLINA SHORES—A requested bond reduction for The Farm at Brunswick failed to garner approval of the town planning and zoning board Monday.

    Developers were seeking release of a $120,000 bond for phases 5 and 7 of the residential community off U.S. 17, town building inspector Jean Crowley said.

    Board member Jim Parsch has driven through the community and had concerns about the area in question.

    “I notice the road looked like what I call ‘skim coat’ to me,” he said at the monthly P&Z meeting.

  • Tree planting in Carolina Shores

    Second-graders from Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary School gather ‘round for the town of Carolina Shores’ Arbor Day tree-planting ceremony last Friday, March 20, at town hall. A red maple tree was planted. 

  • Sunset Beach sewer petitions pouring in

    SUNSET BEACH—More than half the petitions needed to request an extended sewer payback plan have been returned by property owners, an organizer of the effort said Tuesday.

    Carol Scott said so far, signed petitions from both full-time residents and out-of-town property owners have been returning to town hall by the hundreds since the effort was launched two weeks ago.

  • Honor those who help children during Child Abuse Prevention Month

    The Brunswick County Community Child Protection Team will sponsor its third annual flower launch from 4-5 p.m. Wednesday, April 8, at Waterfront Park in Southport to kick off Child Abuse Prevention Month.

    In the past, the event had a solemn tone, focusing on children who died as a result of abuse in North Carolina the previous year.

  • Go native with your landscape; tips for growing plants in Brunswick County

    I’ve never been one of those people who got overly excited about native plants. We do have some wonderful natives, but some of our southern favorites like evergreen azaleas, camellias, gardenias and crape myrtle have all been introduced from other parts of the world.

  • Getting ready for spring; know what to plant and when

    Survival techniques for certain plants provide that they be dormant during harsh weather and they grow and thrive during good weather. Problems arise when the weather becomes similar to springtime conditions and the plants respond by initiating new shoots, buds, leaves, flowers, etc.

  • Landscaping for wildlife: Part II inviting birds into living screens

    Continuing with the discussion of how to invite birds to your home, the first thing to examine is the concept of living screens.

    Living Screens

    Hedges and rows of trees screen off unpleasant views and reduce noise from highways. In crowded neighborhoods, they offer privacy for your backyard activities and they attract birds to your place year after year. Juniper, autumn-olive, dogwood, cotoneaster, or a combination of these, make good living screens.

    Open Areas

  • Cheap doesn’t mean unhealthy; nutrient-rich value for your produce dollar

    As food budgets tighten, you often hear people claim, “it’s more expensive to eat healthy.” Smart shoppers know to look for fresh fruits and vegetables in season and on sale. They also know there are some super healthy produce items that are as expensive as they are tasty.

    Eat Right Montana suggests the following tips for stretching the produce dollar:

    Dried Beans, Peas and Lentils

  • DeHarts celebrate 60 years

    Pauline and Elvin DeHart of Supply celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary. They were married March 25, 1949, in High Point. The couple moved to Supply more than 25 years ago when Elvin retired from Western Electric.