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Today's News

  • Brunswick County grand jury returns indictments

    The Brunswick County Grand Jury under the direction of Judge Ola Lewis with prosecutor Rex Gore and courtroom clerk Michelle Warth returned the following indictments during a Superior Court session on July 6:

    Coty Michael Alford, 18, of 1800 Clemmons Road, Bolivia; felony breaking and/or entering, felony larceny after breaking/entering.

    Danyel Raye Alston, 36, of 7662 Daws Creek Road SE, Winnabow; felony possession of cocaine.

  • Brunswick County district court docket

    The following cases were adjudicated over two days of District Criminal Court on July 12 and 13 in Bolivia.

    Codes: PG, pleaded guilty; PNG/NG, pleaded not guilty, found not guilty; PNG/G, pleaded not guilty, found guilty; BCDC, Brunswick County Detention Center; NCDOC, North Carolina Department of Corrections.

    Monday, July 12

    Judge Scott L. Ussery presided over the following cases with prosecutor Joy Easley and courtroom clerk Jennifer Hearn:

    Andrew Lloyd Barberia, domestic violence protective order violation, voluntarily dismissed.

  • Local restaurants play important roles in our economy, history

    On Friday, as part of Calabash’s annual Town Hall Day celebration, the community’s many restaurants and the people and families who have made them successful will be honored.

    It’s a perfect theme for this year’s event, especially in light of recent struggles faced by the local seafood industry—which contributes to the food on area restaurants’ tables—and the struggling economy that has made doing business a bit more difficult than normal.

  • Think your pet ought to be in pictures? Let us share it with our readers

    Ever take a look at your favorite pet and think it’s so adorable everyone needs to see it?

    If so, we have a great outlet for you.

    Each week, The Brunswick Beacon features a Pet of the Week on our homepage at www.brunswickbeacon.com. We also share our selected Pet of the Week on our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/brunswickbeacon.

    While our submissions so far have been cats and dogs, we welcome submissions of photographs of all types of pets you’ve welcomed to your home—birds, snakes, lizards, mice, hamsters, fish...you name it.

  • Peer Court training session will begin Aug. 17 in Bolivia

     Peer Court is a joint venture between Communities in Schools of Brunswick County and District Attorney Rex Gore.

    It is an alternative system of justice that offers first time juvenile offenders between the ages of 11-16 an opportunity to admit responsibility for their offenses and receive constructive sentencing from their peers. 

    Chargeable offenses may include truancy, disorderly conduct, simple affray, simple assault and others. 

  • Some potty-mouthed mothers could use a little training of their own

    “Mommy, I want sumpin’ to drink,” wailed the unhappy toddler from the backseat. “I want juice.”
    “I know, honey,” I said. “I’ll get you some when I get home. Mommy’s driving right now.”
    “Oh-kay,” he said whimpering.
    I glanced in the rearview mirror. My 2-year-old son was slumped in his car seat, sticking Spiderman and Blue’s Clues stickers on my car’s back window. He appeared to be occupied for the moment.

  • Man sentenced to life in prison receives new trial; pleads guilty to second-degree murder

    BOLIVIA—A 69-year-old man who was sentenced to life in prison for a first-degree murder conviction in 2006 was awarded a new trial, but on Monday he accepted a plea agreement for second-degree murder instead.

    Thomas Duncan pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for the 2005 slaying of his daughter-in-law Jonetta Duncan, assistant district attorney Lee Bollinger said.

    Superior Court Judge Doug Sasser sentenced Duncan to 189 months to 236 months in the North Carolina Department of Corrections.

  • Using vines in the landscape to create screens in limited space

    Sometimes, when there is not enough space for a hedge or a shrub, but a screen is needed, vines may be the answer. 

    Vines help add privacy, camouflage wire fences, hide an unsightly wall, or add character to tight places. They can create a shade buffer from the hot sun on the side of a building or cover a romantic walkway into a garden “room.” There are several vines both popular and appropriate for use in gardens of North Carolina.

  • Detention center to house federal inmates

    Monday night, Brunswick County Commissioners approved a contract between the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office and the U.S. Marshals Service to house federal inmates at the Brunswick County Detention Center in Bolivia.

    Brunswick County Manager Marty Lawing said the detention center was designed and constructed to house 444 inmates.

    “The inmate population has leveled off and declined,” Lawing said.

  • Federal elections: Where all roads to Washington are lined in dollar signs

    Somewhere along the line I learned a valuable, on-the-job lesson—follow the money.

    Let me rephrase that—always follow the money.

    There might be some twists and turns along the way, but, more often than not, it will usually take you to where you want to go.

    This fiscal rule of thumb pertains to politicians and government officials who are in or are yet to be in office. Campaign finance reports, for instance, are like a window into a candidate’s brain. You thought I was going to say soul, didn’t you?