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Today's News

  • It may actually be my fault snow found its way to Brunswick County

    When I first heard last week there was a chance of snow for Brunswick County, I thought someone was joking. I moved to the coast to escape the colder, often-snowy winter months of Kentucky, and the last thing I thought about encountering here was a chance of snow.

  • Belly-fat bombardment difficult to stomach

    If aliens from outer space were to drop in and cruise the Internet lately, they wouldn’t know we were in economic turmoil.

    They wouldn’t think we face an uncertain future or fears about everything, including them.

    No, they would think the biggest priority on our worry list is belly fat.

    Have you noticed? How could you not?

    It’s the unsightliest, most graphic advertisement ever to invade the World Wide Web—big, gloppy bellies protruding over waistlines, accompanied by headlines like, “One flat-belly rule: Obey.”

  • Town Creek redistricting brings up fears about transportation, traffic and ride times

    LELAND—Traffic and transportation were among parents’ major concerns at last Wednesday’s public forum regarding redistricting lines for Town Creek Elementary School, which is set to open in fall 2009.

    Cristie Ledlord has three children in Brunswick County Schools, one of which may be affected by redistricting lines. Her son currently attends Belville Elementary School, but would be redistricted to Town Creek if the board of education chose scenario three.

  • Who’s afraid of the big bad digital switch? The Senate, that’s who

    During the middle of what people call the worst economic crisis in history, the Senate passed an oh-so extremely important bill on Monday—a bill allowing a near four-month delay in the switch to digital television.

    This comes only days after President Barack Obama discussed a possible delay in the nationwide switch shortly before his inauguration. Now, I’m not that political, and I am not one to criticize the leader of the free world, but aren’t there more important issues to tackle and don’t some of those issues need immediate attention?

  • Searcher believes remains found in S.C. are missing woman

    Authorities have recovered a human skull and bone fragments off a rural road in Horry County, S.C., believed to be connected with the disappearance of a woman who was abducted and brought to Brunswick County in November 2002.

    The possible remains of Alice Donovan of Galivants Ferry, S.C., have been sent to a lab in Columbia, S.C., for DNA testing. They were discovered last week by a voluntary search group with the CUE Center for Missing Persons in Wilmington.

  • Facing mastectomy, 37-year-old shares story

    SHALLOTTE—The breast pain came on suddenly last September, alarming 37-year-old Angie Sutton with its persistence.

    In November, Sutton, director of advertising for The Brunswick Beacon, was diagnosed with Stage 0 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a “non-invasive” cancer of breast milk ducts that does not spread to surrounding tissue.

  • On and off the court, Yow was an ambassador

    The human race—not just women’s basketball—has lost one of its greatest ambassadors.

    Kay Yow, the longtime N.C. State women’s basketball coach, ended her splendid, earthly journey Saturday, 22 years after she was diagnosed with cancer.

    Kay didn’t just sip life, she gulped it. There was too much to savor while she was living on borrowed time. Some would say miraculous time.

  • Special dog for a special person

    Kermit is a 6-month-old special-needs Doberman mix who was born without the use of his hind legs due to severe hip dysplasia. When Kermit was 4 months old, he was brought to a veterinarian by his owner, who asked that he be euthanized. But the vet fell in love with Kermit and his endearing personality, treated and healed his sores and outfitted him with his very own wheeled cart to get around in. Now all he needs is a home. Volunteers with Adopt-An-Angel say Kermit would be great in a home with children or serving as a therapy dog with children who have physical disabilities.

  • UDO draws objections from Calabash business owners

    CALABASH—A standing-room-only crowd, consisting mostly of local business owners, turned out Tuesday night to register complaints about the town’s pending Unified Development Ordinance.

    The gist of their argument is the draft UDO imposes rules over the town’s core commercial district that don’t fit in with Calabash, such as banning roof signs, requiring uniform design and dictating colors buildings can be painted.

  • Officials allow gap in sandbag line to be filled

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—Officials from the Division of Coastal Management (DCM) have given the go-ahead for Ocean Isle Beach to write a permit for sandbags which will close a gap in a continuous line that runs from the quickly eroding east end to Charlotte Street.

    The gap, which is west of Shallotte Boulevard, was previously unable to be sandbagged because it did not meet a state rule that states sandbags have to be 20 feet from a structure.