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Today's News

  • Schools calendar may include Saturday make-up days

    BOLIVIA—Multiple make-up days may result in Saturday classes for all Brunswick County Schools students next year.

    The 2009-1010 calendar committee, which was made-up of one parent and one teacher from all 18 schools, unanimously agreed to use half-day Saturdays in times of emergency.

  • BCC offers continuing education courses for the community

    The Continuing Education and Workforce Development Department at Brunswick Community College offers short-term programs and classes for self-improvement, cultural enrichment and academic achievement geared toward adults seeking skills for employment, intellectual stimulation, community involvement and social interaction.

    Many small business courses are free due to funding from a Small Business Center grant. Seniors, 65 and older, can also take many classes free of charge.

  • Supply Elementary announces student awards, honor rolls

    Supply Elementary School has announced its second nine-weeks awards and honor roll:

    VFW awards

  • From geek to sports nut: One woman’s journey

    As a kid, I was the geek princess. I took voice lessons, piano lessons, diction lessons and yes, violin lessons. Check out my yearbook and you’ll see I was president of the National Honor Society and I sang in the Glee Club.

    No sports.

    Then I went to Syracuse University.

  • WBHS performs 'Rumors'

    What should be an evening of celebration quickly turns into a mystery involving blood betrayal and baffling situations.

    “Rumors,” a farce by Neil Simon, was performed at the West Brunswick High School Theatre. The student-directed show involved a cast of 10 characters who walk into a night of chaos when arriving at the New York home of Charley and Myra Brock.

    The Brocks are holding a party celebrating their 10th anniversary, but their friends arrive to find Myra nowhere in sight and Charley in an upstairs bedroom, bleeding from a gunshot wound to his ear.

  • The groundhog says: Six more weeks of winter await us

    Don’t put those sweaters away—according to old Punxsutawny Phil there’ll be six more weeks of winter.

    On Feb. 2, I turned on the morning news and watched as reporters were on location just outside the groundhog’s hole. There they were standing around, whispering—waiting for the groundhog to emerge from his hollow home.

  • Have an action plan

    Successful people or are usually goal-oriented. Dr. Martin Luther King was a goal-oriented person; he had a specific goal and some clearly defined objectives and a solid action plan to achieve his goal.

    He was not afraid of listening to different ideas of men and women who were accomplished in their right. He surrounded himself with strong capable associates.

  • EDC director says new terminal can be beneficial if it's done right

    Brunswick County Economic Development Commission Director Jim Bradshaw says if citizens’ environmental and transportation issues are properly addressed, the international container terminal planned for Southport can be a positive addition to Brunswick County.

    Bradshaw said half the prospective businesses he’s working with that are considering locating in Brunswick County are related to the existing port in Wilmington, and if a new terminal were to be built, that number would increase dramatically.

  • Brunswick native McLamb donates more land for affordable housing

    Driving down Marlowtown Road last week, W.J. McLamb pointed out houses he built for employees in the 1970s and explained why he recently donated another 11 lots for affordable housing.

    More than three decades ago, McLamb saw a transformation in workers settling into one of the freshly built houses they could finally call home.

    “It gave them more pride,” said the longtime developer and Brunswick County native as he rode along with local developer Brian Smith and his daughter, Teresa McLamb. “They actually worked harder and were more dependable.”

  • What happened to humanity and the decree to ‘love thy neighbor’?

    People often refer to the past as “the good ol’ days”—times when things moved slower, technology had less necessity in our lives, and neighbors called upon one another in times of need.

    What has happened to that? Why is it in this fast-paced, technology-driven, I-don’t-have-to-acknowledge-you-because-something-electronic-is-flashing-in-my-hands era have we lost sight of one of the most basic human values?