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Today's News

  • District 8 Senate update

    By Sen. Bill Rabon

    Guest Columnist

    Editor’s note: The Beacon has tried for two months to reach Sen. Bill Rabon by phone and email for comment about Senate Bill 215, which lists him as the bill’s primary sponsor and calls for the state “to abolish the office of coroner in Brunswick County.” Senate Bill 215 was reported favorable to the Senate’s standing committee on health care and re-referred to the Senate Judiciary I Committee on March 31.

  • If we save it, they will come

    By Camilla M. Herlevich and Dan Ryan

    Guest Columnists

     

    It’s not surprising that the most innovative tech company in the world, Apple, is shaking up the conservation community with its bold decision to invest in 36,000 acres of American forests. Apple’s news release cites a commitment to ensure a steady supply of sustainably harvested timber for its paper and packaging needs.

  • Mother’s Day memories from a lucky son

    By Mike O’Hare

    Guest Columnist

     

    Anna Jarvis, from Grafton, W.Va., had the great idea for Mother’s Day and President Woodrow Wilson established it as a national holiday in 1914. Thanks Anna, because Mother’s Day has given me some great memories.

    The day before Mother’s Day, Dad would buy a corsage for Mom to wear to church on Sunday. We’d try to hide it in the refrigerator behind something; I’m pretty sure she saw it most years but acted surprised anyhow on Sunday morning.

  • Discrimination adds no value to community

    When Shallotte native Robert Stanley founded the Beacon in 1962, he dedicated the newspaper to “the continued progress of Brunswick County.” When he died last year, friends and family said he took great pride in publicly standing on the “right side of history during civil rights struggles in the turbulent ‘60s.”

    More than 50 years later, the Beacon maintains the stand Stanley took: That the Ku Klux Klan contributes nothing to the improvement of our community.

  • Making our county a community

    Last week, I had the privilege to represent the Beacon at the General Federation of Women’s Clubs-South Brunswick Islands’ “A Night of Benevolence — Caring for Our Community” at Shallotte Presbyterian Church.

    I have to admit I hadn’t planned on attending — it took place April 27, the night before our production day when deadlines for the week’s next edition bear down on us — but the group’s president, Cindy Hewett was insistent. I’m glad I went.

  • Leadership: Allen credits many for his baseball success

     Talk to Hunter Allen about baseball for a few minutes, and it becomes apparent why he is a co-captain of the East Carolina University baseball team.

    Whatever success he has had, he mentions those responsible. Whether is it is a state-championship winning high school baseball coach or an anonymous college athletic trainer, Allen will tell you how that person has helped him.

    And he does so as effortlessly as he swings his bat at a 90-mph fastball or as easily as he times his swing toward an off-speed curveball.

  • Quick soups and chili –– not from a can!

      

    Soups are always a good choice, either as a meal starter or as a complete meal in itself. In most cases, they are good choices nutritionally because of the variety of foods.

    Usually, soups contain lots of vegetables and small amounts of fat. A little meat can go a long way in even the heartiest soup. Adding beans and brown rice provides fiber, as well as flavor.

  • Caro, the story of a good shepherd

     Once upon a time, in a land quite far from here, there lived a shepherd whose name was Caro. He was a gentle man who lived a simple life on a tiny patch of land he had inherited from his father, and his grandfather before him.

     

    Caro lived in a little hut made from stone that had been gathered from the hillside nearby. It had only one room, and its furniture was sturdy but simple: a table and chair, a straw mat for sleeping, one oil lamp, and a few pots and pans for cooking. A huge fireplace provided heat and light.

  • What is this mystery plant?

      By John Nelson

    Petruchio: “Nay, come, Kate, come: you must not look so sour.”

    Katharina: “It is my fashion, when I see a crab.”

    Petruchio: “Why, here’s no crab; and therefore look not sour.”

    The Taming of the Shrew

    (More humor from Shakespeare! This time, you would need to know what Elizabethans would call a sour apple.)

     

  • Strawberries ready for picking at local produce farms

     Strawberries typically peak during May in our area. Producing good strawberries depends on ideal spring weather conditions. Although our area has been hit hard by cold and rainy weather this spring, berries are ripe for the pickin’ and hopefully the weather will improve enough to extend the season.