Today's News

  • No-bake desserts require little time and minimal ingredients

    If you’re like me and really aren’t into baking, no-bake desserts usually come to mind. Many pies, cakes and cookies are made with ingredients that don’t require any baking. And best of all, the traditional no-bake types don’t use very many ingredients, but may require freezing or refrigeration.

  • What is this mystery plant?

    By John Nelson

    If I’d a cow that gave such milk, I'd dress her in the finest silk;

    Feed her lots of sweet, sweet hay, and milk her twenty times a day.

                                                    — Joseph Winner, “Little Brown Jug”


  • Why do certain songs make you feel so good?

    By Linda Arnold


    You know the feeling. You’re driving along, and a favorite tune comes on the radio.  Immediately, it causes a warm feeling to wash over you. What’s up with that? 

    Listening to favorite music causes your brain to release dopamine, the “feel good” chemical that’s released when you experience pleasure and reward.

  • Lent is a time to rediscover God in prayerfulness

    Psalm 105 begins with a “forbidden” word: ALLELUIA! This is something Roman Catholics have been taught. Carefully trained to avoid announcing our alleluias until Easter arrives, it is an instruction likely having more to do with our need to be sober about our praying than to recite somber prayers. Save your joy until Easter and you’ll savor it all the more. This is apparently the underlying message. 

  • How did a euthanasia drug get into pet foods?

    On New Year’s Eve 2016, Nicole and Guy Mael decided to celebrate with their five pugs by offering a special meal of Evanger’s “Hunk of Beef Au Jus” canned dog food.

    Within minutes after sharing the can of Evanger’s, all of the dogs were staggering and convulsing, and rushed to a nearby veterinary emergency clinic. Sadly, one of the pugs, Talula, died a few hours later

    The owners sent the remainder of the food for analysis at Michigan State University Diagnostic Center and had a necropsy conducted on Talula.

  • Food safety in the news

    There was an interesting and scary story going around the Internet a couple of weeks ago related to food safety. Perhaps you read about the man in California who pulled a five-foot tapeworm out of his body. Doctors are thinking this tapeworm came from a parasite found in raw salmon. The man confessed he loves sushi and eats it frequently.

    First, you may ask, could this really happen? Yes it could. The tapeworm is a form of parasite that can enter the body in food and then continue to live and grow within the host. Yikes!  

  • District 17 House update

    By Rep. Frank Iler

    Guest Columnist

    Last week in the North Carolina General Assembly, we passed the bill known as the “class size fix” for elementary schools, we continued to hold dozens of committee meetings, I was able to attend meetings back here in the district, and candidate filing started all over the state.

  • Congress quietly creates a new health care crisis

    By Pamela Tripp

    Guest Columnist

    A virulent flu season is under way and the number of opioid overdoses

    continues to climb, yet our public health is more vulnerable than ever because Community Health Centers like CommWell Health are running out of time and money.

    Critical funding for our program expired Oct. 1, 2017. Since then, all health centers have been operating under a “funding cliff.”

  • Sunset Beach accomplished much last year

    By Robert A. Forrester

    Guest Columnist

    During calendar year 2017, Sunset Beach town staff and town council addressed and accomplished a substantial number of matters. A brief synopsis follows:


  • The Beacon moves to new press plant in Charleston, S.C.

    Something’s different about your Beacon this week, but it’s so subtle you may not be able to figure out what it is.

    I’ll go ahead and tell you: The pages are a smidgen shorter but a skosh wider.

    Something else has changed, too: What’s printed on the pages should be much crisper and easier to read.

    Want more good news?

    Although our community news deadline remains noon Thursdays, we expect to work through our backlog of submissions much more quickly — and soon.