Today's News

  • Testimony for former officer continues in fourth day of gender discrimination trial

    BOLIVIA—It was a tale of two letters during day four of the Terri Oxford wrongful termination trial against the town of Holden Beach.

    Oxford, who sued the town for wrongful termination and gender discrimination after she was fired from the Holden Beach Police Department in 2008, testified during the first two days of the hearing as to the working conditions while working for Holden Beach Police Chief Wally Layne.

  • Brunswick loses in N.C. Junior Dixie Boys title game

      SOUTHPORT—Hope Mills won two games against Brunswick County in taking the N.C. Junior Dixie Boys Baseball state championship.

    Hope Mills had to win two games to win the title and advance to the Junior Dixie Boys World Series, and it did so by beating Brunswick 3-1 in seven innings July 20 and 5-4 in nine innings July 21.

    Below are summaries of the games, played in 90-degree heat at Smithville Park.




  • Federal money appropriated for local beaches and inlets

    More than $22 million in federal funds have been appropriated for beaches and inlets in southeastern North Carolina, as well as the Intracoastal Waterway and the Wilmington Port.

    “Our coast is the lifeline for economic growth in our region,” U.S. Rep. Mike McIntyre said in a press release. “Federal support is critical to enhancing and protecting the economic and environmental treasure of our coast.”

  • First sea turtle nest hatching on Ocean Isle Beach

    OCEAN ISLE BEACH—The first sea turtle nest of the 2010 season is hatching on Ocean Isle Beach.

    The nest, near the Concord Street beach access, began hatching Sunday night, Gloria Hillenburg, coordinator of the Ocean Isle Beach Turtle Patrol, said. Baby loggerhead sea turtles emerged about 8:30 p.m. Sunday, and were still hatching as of Tuesday afternoon. Hillenburg said 70 turtles had left the nest so far.

  • Tubb named CTE director of the year by state association

    As director of Brunswick County Schools’ career technical education (CTE) program, Les Tubb said he’s the person who takes the blame whenever things don’t go well.

    When things go well, he prefers to pass the credit on to his staff.

    And even after being named the North Carolina Career Technical Education Administrator of the Year by the North Carolina Association of Career and Technical Education during the state conference Monday, Tubb took the opportunity to once again highlight his staff and the program’s accomplishments.

  • Brunswick Community College tuition increases 13 percent

    BOLIVIA—Tuition for the fall 2010 semester at Brunswick Community College has increased $6.50 per credit hour for North Carolina residents—a 13 percent increase compared to this time last year.

    Non-North Carolina residents will pay an extra $7.20 per credit hour for the 2010 fall semester. In-state residents paid $50 per credit hour in fall 2009.

    Liz McClean, director of marketing for BCC, said all tuition increases are determined by the state.

  • Deficit in school budget ‘not as bad’ as anticipated

    BOLIVIA—Brunswick County school officials think the final budget for the 2010-2011 fiscal year will not be as bad as anticipated.

    The district’s preliminary budget included about $4 million in state reductions, which included a discretionary reduction and another estimated three percent reduction. Freyja Cahill, executive finance officer, said the state opted to use lottery money to help save teacher jobs throughout the state, and the three percent reduction is not set to take place this fiscal year.

  • Local officials say they'll continue push for terminal groins

    Mayor Debbie Smith said the east end of Ocean Isle Beach “has had a problem on and off for many years,” and more than a dozen homes have been relocated due to continual erosion of the beach strand. She can only recall one that was truly lost due to erosion.

    “It gradually went away,” she said.

    To help save the east end and beaches along the coast in similar situations, Smith has been vocal in supporting Senate Bill 832, which would allow currently banned terminal groins from being built in inlets to help combat erosion.

  • Towns, residents struggle with erosion, looking for solutions

    Thirteen years ago, Eli Gold and his wife, Claudette, had a plan. They purchased the last house on East Third Street in Ocean Isle Beach and planned to retire there full-time once their daughter went to college.

    They never dreamed their retirement plan would be at risk of one day being swallowed by the sea.

    Thirteen years ago, the Golds’ house was behind four other houses. Third Street extended beyond their property line, and the town’s infrastructure was intact.

    Over the years, “the erosion eventually won,” Eli Gold said.

  • Seafood Capital celebrates legacy of eateries Friday

      CALABASH—Diners lining up in the Seafood Capital during a busy summer suppertime can see the good-natured debate and choices live on when it comes to eating Calabash-style.

    “This is it!” proclaims a sign and arrow pointing out Beck’s Restaurant near the corner of Beach Drive and River Road.