Today's News

  • Early morning and night fishing are best options now

     A cool front came in last week and made temperatures more bearable again, and we are still holding in the low 90s. 

    Water temperature is still extremely high everywhere, however, and what was a solid few weeks of fishing all over has turned into more of the usual summer pattern, with fish very deep or inactive during a large part of the day. Early morning and night fishing are the best options now.

  • Inspirations Dance Centre participates in Showstopper championships

     Inspirations Dance Centre dancers were awarded “Gold” and “Platinum” ratings for six group dances, two duets and six solos in a recent competition. 

    The Extreme Company received a platinum first place and sixth overall for its jazz dance “Aha!” and a platinum first place and fifth overall for its contemporary dance “Slow Me Down.” 

  • Holmes selected to All-America team

    Brock Holmes is the first Brunswick Community College baseball player to be selected to the National Junior College Athletic Association Division II All-America team.

    Holmes, in his freshman year, made third-team All-America in Division II. BCC coach Robbie Allen said Holmes deserved the recognition.

    “We were concerned about him, where his role was going to be in our rotation,” Allen said. “We were concerned as to whether or not he was even going to be in the rotation or be eligible to play for us.

  • South Brunswick Rotary awards scholarships

     The South Brunswick Islands Rotary Club annually awards a $1,000 scholarship to three West Brunswick High School seniors and one $500 scholarship to a senior member of the WBHS band. 

    Receiving the three $1,000 scholarships were Hanna Lee Adkins, Megan Campbell and Haley Enzor. The band scholarship was presented to Helene Paul. 

    This year’s recipients, along with their parents and guardians, attended the SBI Rotary meeting and breakfast at Tamers Restaurant on June 18 to receive recognition for their awards and to talk with club members.

  • New book offers spiritual guidance, calls to action

     Twelve chapters long, “Loving Creation: Christian spirituality, earth-centered and just” by Kathleen Fischer can well serve as the Ten Commandments for the 21st century and beyond. 

    As I began my reading, it became quickly obvious this would not be a volume one might casually peruse. Although the information was not new to me, the text continues to demand serious thought, contemplation, reflection and, ultimately, action.

  • Wilmington Area Woodturners participate in national competition

     Wilmington Area Woodturners Association (WAWA) is an organization of woodturners from counties throughout southeastern North Carolina and northeastern South Carolina. Seventeen members of WAWA came together to develop, design and build the chapter’s second entry in the Chapter Collaborative Challenge, shown and judged at the AAW National Conference June 17-20. 

    Several Brunswick residents are members of the group.

  • Champion-McCahill

     Chalmers Fuller Champion of Shallotte and 1st Lt. Patrick Sean McCahill of Melbourne, Fla., were married May 15 at St. Andrew's Episcopal Church in Morehead City with the Rev. John Pollock officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of Jerry Wayne and Cynthia Champion of Shallotte. The groom is the son of Francis X. McCahill III and Karen McCahill of Melbourne, Fla.

  • Naturalization ceremony brings new enthusiasm for Fourth of July events

    I’ve always loved the Fourth of July. I love fireworks, the festival in Southport and the time away from work. But this year, I gained a new appreciation for the Fourth of July as I watched the naturalization ceremony.

  • After 12 years, resident becomes U.S. citizen

    Cathy Duthie has lived in the United States for more than 12 years. Originally from Canada, she said she never really thought about becoming an American citizen until about four years ago.

    “It’s something that I’ve wanted to do, and it took a lot of thought,” she said. “It’s a very emotional thing to give up your allegiance to one country and give it to another.”

  • Immigrants become citizens at naturalization ceremony

    Southport—Last Sunday, Mary Claire Njeri took her oath of citizenship surrounded by her family—many of whom had traveled from Nairobi, Kenya, to share the moment with her.
    “This is how I roll now,” she said to her family as she held up her certificate of citizenship.
    Njeri and 124 other people from all over the world gathered in on the Garrison Lawn at Fort Johnston in Southport to take the oath of allegiance to become American citizens.